Upcoming online training courses in November/December 2020

The online training courses that we started earlier this year continue to have a good success, and as our sessions scheduled for September/October are now completed or full, we are happy to announce our next set of dates for November/December:

All courses are taught by experienced Bootlin engineers, who are not just trainers: they in fact spend most of their time working on engineering projects for our customers, and share their experience through these training courses. The above courses will be taught by Michael Opdenacker, Alexandre Belloni, Maxime Chevallier, Paul Kocialkowski and Thomas Petazzoni.

Note that in addition to those public training courses, we can upon request organize dedicated online training courses, to match the needs, schedule and availability of our customers. Do not hesitate to contact us for any question.

Bootlin toolchains 2020.08 released

Bootlin toolchainsWe are happy to announce a new release of the freely available cross-compilation toolchains we provide at toolchains.bootlin.com, version 2020.08-1.

Here are the main changes compared to our previous 2020.02 release:

  • Bleeding edge toolchains are now using: gcc 10.2, binutils 2.34, gdb 9.2, kernel headers 5.4, glibc 2.31, musl 1.2.0, uclibc-ng 1.0.34
  • Stable toolchains are using: gcc 9.3, binutils 2.33, gdb 8.3, kernel headers 4.9, glibc 2.31, musl 1.2.0, uclibc-ng 1.0.34
  • Fortran support has been enabled in all tolchains
  • Several new CPU architecture variants are supported, each with a new toolchain
  • Boot testing in Qemu was added for PowerPC64 E5500, NIOSII and m68k MCF5208.

In addition, it is worth mentioning that all those Bootlin toolchains are now directly accessible from Buildroot: make menuconfig shows the Bootlin toolchains available for the current selected CPU architecture, and Buildroot is able to automatically download and use the toolchain. This feature will be available starting from Buildroot 2020.11:

Thanks again to the entire Buildroot community, and especially Romain Naour, for all the fixes and improvements related to toolchain support that make this project possible. In the next weeks, we hope to be able to deliver further updated bleeding-edge toolchains, with glibc 2.32 and binutils 2.35. Stay tuned!

If you face any issue, or need additional features in those toolchains, do not hesitate to report an issue in our issue tracker.

Bootlin at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2020

Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2020The schedule for the next Embedded Linux Conference Europe has been recently published, and Bootlin will once again be strongly present at this (virtual) event by giving a number of presentations. The registration for ELC-E is open, and due to the virtual nature of the event, the registration cost is only $50, which makes is accessible to pretty much everybody.

  • From the Camera Sensor to the User, the Journey of a Video Frame. In this talk, Bootlin engineer Maxime Chevallier will share his experience working in the Video4Linux subsystem, implementing support for the Rockchip camera interface controller, and a PAL/NTSC decoder used as the input source. Talk on Monday October 26 at 18:30 GMT.
  • Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded: A Collection of Best Practices. In this talk, Bootlin engineer, and Yocto Project expert and trainer Alexandre Belloni will share his experience of using Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded through a collection of best practices. There are indeed numerous ways of using OpenEmbedded and the Yocto Project, but some ways and solutions are better than others! Talk on Tuesday October 27 at 13:00 GMT.
  • Building Embedded Debian and Ubuntu Systems with ELBE. In this talk, Köry Maincent will share his experience using the ELBE build system, which can be used to automate the process of creating embedded Linux systems based on Debian or Ubuntu. Köry has contributed to ELBE the support for building Ubuntu systems, and has used ELBE on two different projects. This is an interesting alternative to the traditional cross-compilation approach taken by Yocto Project, OpenEmbedded or Buildroot. Talk on Tuesday October 27 at 15:15 GMT.
  • Using Visual Studio Code for Embedded Development. In this talk, Michael Opdenacker will share his experiments of using VS Code for embedded Linux development, which extensions are available to help navigate in the code, build and debug code, from kernel-space and user-space. Talk on Tuesday October 27 at 17:15 GMT.
  • Precision Time Protocol (PTP) and Packet Timestamping in Linux. Antoine Ténart has implemented PTP support in both an Ethernet switch driver, and an Ethernet PHY driver, both in the upstream Linux kernel. He will share his experience about PTP, its support in Linux, and its offloading at the MAC and PHY level. Talk on Tuesday October 27 at 19:30 GMT.
  • Supporting Hardware-Accelerated Video Encoding with Mainline. After working on the HW-accelerated video decoding on Allwinner platforms as part of our crowdfunded effort, Paul Kocialkowski recently worked on HW-accelerated video encoding on Rockchip platforms. In this talk, he will share the issues encountered, and what needs to be resolved to create a useful kernel to userspace interface to properly support stateless video encoders. Talk on Wednesday October 28 at 16:15 GMT.
  • Understand ECC Support for NAND Flash Devices in Linux. Miquèl Raynal, the Linux kernel NAND subsystem maintainer, has recently worked on improving support for various strategies to handle ECC for NAND flash devices. He will share some background information on ECC, why they are needed, how and where ECC are typically handled, and how the Linux kernel deals with the different possibilities. Talk on Wednesday October 28 at 18:30 GMT.

In addition to contributing talks, Bootlin CTO Thomas Petazzoni is also a member of the ELC-E program committee: he reviewed, ranked all talk submitted for the conference and participated with the rest of the committee to the selection of the talks that are now scheduled for the event.

Even though we once again won’t have the chance to meet our fellow members of the embedded Linux community in person, we look forward to attending a set of great talks, and have interesting discussions during the Q&A and through the instant messaging platform that will be available around the conference.

Bootlin contributes SquashFS support to U-Boot

SquashFS is a very popular read-only compressed root filesystem, widely used in embedded systems. It has been supported in the Linux kernel for many years, but so far the U-Boot bootloader did not have support for SquashFS, so it was not possible to load a kernel image or a Device Tree Blob from a SquashFS filesystem in U-Boot.

Between February 2020 and August 2020, João Marcos Costa from the ENSICAEN engineering school, has worked at Bootlin as an intern. João’s internship goal was specifically to implement and contribute to U-Boot the support for the SquashFS filesystem. We are happy to announce that João’s effort has now completed, as the support for SquashFS is now in upstream U-Boot. It can be found in fs/squashfs/ in the U-Boot source code.

More specifically, João’s contributions have been:

In addition to those contributions already merged, João has also submitted for inclusion the support for LZO and ZSTD decompression support.

Practically speaking, this SquashFS support works very much like the support for other filesystems. At build time, you need to enable the CONFIG_FS_SQUASHFS option for the SquashFS driver itself, and CONFIG_CMD_SQUASHFS for the SquashFS U-Boot commands. Once enabled, in U-Boot, you get:

=> sqfsls     
sqfsls - List files in directory. Default: root (/).
 
Usage:
sqfsls  [] [directory]
    - list files from 'dev' on 'interface' in 'directory'
 
=> sqfsload 
sqfsload - load binary file from a SquashFS filesystem
 
Usage:
sqfsload  [ [ [ [bytes [pos]]]]]
    - Load binary file 'filename' from 'dev' on 'interface'
      to address 'addr' from SquashFS filesystem.
      'pos' gives the file position to start loading from.
      If 'pos' is omitted, 0 is used. 'pos' requires 'bytes'.
      'bytes' gives the size to load. If 'bytes' is 0 or omitted,
      the load stops on end of file.
      If either 'pos' or 'bytes' are not aligned to
      ARCH_DMA_MINALIGN then a misaligned buffer warning will
      be printed and performance will suffer for the load.

sqfsls is obviously used to list files, here the list of files from a typical Linux root filesystem:

=> sqfsls mmc 0:1
            bin/
            boot/
            dev/
            etc/
            lib/
    <SYM>   lib32
    <SYM>   linuxrc
            media/
            mnt/
            opt/
            proc/
            root/
            run/
            sbin/
            sys/
            tmp/
            usr/
            var/
 
2 file(s), 16 dir(s)

And then you can use sqfsload to load files, which we illustrate here by loading a Linux kernel image and Device Tree blob, and booting this kernel:

=> sqfsload mmc 0:1 $kernel_addr_r /boot/zImage
6160384 bytes read in 433 ms (13.6 MiB/s)
=> sqfsload mmc 0:1 0x81000000 /boot/am335x-boneblack.dtb
40817 bytes read in 11 ms (3.5 MiB/s)
=> setenv bootargs console=ttyO0,115200n8
=> bootz $kernel_addr_r - 0x81000000
## Flattened Device Tree blob at 81000000
   Booting using the fdt blob at 0x81000000
   Loading Device Tree to 8fff3000, end 8fffff70 ... OK
 
Starting kernel ...
 
[    0.000000] Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0
[    0.000000] Linux version 4.19.79 (joaomcosta@joaomcosta-Latitude-E7470) (gcc version 7.3.1 20180425 [linaro-7.3-2018.05 revision d29120a424ecfbc167ef90065c0eeb7f91977701] (Linaro GCC 7.3-2018.05)) #1 SMP Fri May 29 18:26:39 CEST 2020
[    0.000000] CPU: ARMv7 Processor [413fc082] revision 2 (ARMv7), cr=10c5387d

Of course, the SquashFS driver is still fresh, and there is a chance that more extensive and widespread testing will uncover a few bugs or limitations, which we’re sure the broader U-Boot community will help address. Overall, we’re really happy to have contributed this new functionality to U-Boot, it will be useful for our projects, and we hope it will be useful to many others in the embedded Linux community!

Linux 5.8 released: Bootlin contributions

Linux 5.8 was released recently. See our usual resources for a good coverage of the highlights of this new release: KernelNewbies page, LWN.net article on the first part of the merge window, LWN.net article on the second part of the merge window.

On our side, we contributed a total of 155 commits to Linux 5.8, which makes Bootlin the 19th contributing company by number of commits according to Linux Kernel Patch Statistic. The highlights of our contributions are:

  • Miquèl Raynal contributed a completely new NAND controller driver: the arasan-nand-controller driver, used on Xilinx platforms.
  • In the MTD subsystem, Miquèl Raynal, as one of the co-maintainers, made a substantial number of contributions: cleanups in the nandsim driver, drop of the nand_release() API, support in the NAND core for the specificities of the arasan-nand-controller driver in terms of ECC handling (we will soon publish a blog post on this topic!)
  • On the support of Atmel/Microchip platforms
    • Alexandre Belloni migrated the SAMA5D3, AT91SAM9N12, AT91RM9200 and AT91SAM9G45 Device Tree files to use the new clock DT bindings
    • Grégory Clement modified the atmel_usba_udc USB device controller driver to no longer require describing all USB endpoints in the Device Tree, since they are always the same for a given SoC.
  • Grégory Clement contributed a number of improvements and fixes for the n_gsm line discipline driver, which allows to multiplex an UART used to communicate with a GSM modem. These improvements and fixes allowed the n_gsm driver to be fully stable for one of our customers.
  • In the RTC subsystem, Alexandre Belloni (maintainer of that subsystem) did a number of small improvements to various RTC drivers.
  • Antoine Ténart has done a number of improvements in the support for Microchip/Microsemi networking products: improvements to the mscc-miim MDIO driver, improvements to the MSCC Ocelot Ethernet switch driver, improvements to the MSCC Ethernet PHY Driver.

Also, several Bootlin engineers are maintainers of various areas of the Linux kernel:

  • Miquèl Raynal, as the NAND maintainer and MTD co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 57 patches from other contributors
  • Alexandre Belloni, as the RTC maintainer and Microchip platform support co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 54 patches from other contributors
  • Grégory Clement, as the Marvell EBU platform support co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 13 patches from other contributors

Here is the complete list of our contributions: