Online Embedded Linux system development course in new time zones

Since April 2020, we are offering our training courses online, both in public sessions available to individual registration and in dedicated sessions for specific customers.

So far, our public sessions have always been organized from 2 PM to 6 PM Paris time, which was a good fit for our customers in Europe and in the US East Coast, but not so much for our customers in the US West Coast, in the Middle East and Asia.

Therefore, we are happy to announce that we have opened two sessions of our Embedded Linux system development course at different times, to suit the needs of customers in different parts of the world:

  • An Embedded Linux system development course will start on November 22, spread over 7 sessions of 4 hours organized from 09:00 to 13:00 Paris time (UTC+1), which is 13:30 to 17:30 in India, and 16:00 to 20:00 in China. This time is best for our customers in Europe, Middle East and Asia. Registration is possible directly online or by contacting us to get a quotation. The trainer for this course will be Grégory Clement.
  • An Embedded Linux system development course will start on November 29, spread over 7 sessions of 4 hours organized from 18:00 to 22:00 Paris time (UTC+1), which is 09:00 to 13:00 in the US West Coast, and 12:00 to 16:00 in the US East Coast. Registration is possible directly online or by contacting us to get a quotation. The trainer for this course will be Michael Opdenacker.

In both cases, the course is offered at 829 EUR per participant in the early bird rate (valid for registrations at least one month prior to the course starting date), or otherwise at 929 EUR.

Of course, like for all our training courses, the training materials are fully open, so that you can verify that the course suits your needs. See Embedded Linux system development training page for the complete agenda, slides and lab instructions.

If there is sufficient interest in these new time zones, we will consider offering our other courses at similar times in the future.

Bootlin contributions to Linux 5.13

After finally publishing about our Linux 5.12 contributions and even though Linux 5.14 was just released yesterday, it’s hopefully still time to talk about our contributions to Linux 5.13. Check out the LWN articles about the merge window to get the bigger picture about this release: part 1 and part 2.

In terms of Bootlin contributions, this was a much more quiet release than Linux 5.12, with just 28 contributions. The main highlights are:

  • The usual round of RTC subsystem updates from its maintainer Alexandre Belloni
  • A large amount of improvements in the MTD subsystem by its co-maintainer Miquèl Raynal, continuing his effort to improve the ECC handling in the MTD subsystem. See Miquèl’s talk at ELCE 2020 for more details on this effort: slides and video.
  • A small fix for an annoying regression in the musb USB gadget controller driver.

Even though we contributed just 28 commits to this release, as maintainers, some of us also reviewed and merged code from other contributors: Miquèl Raynal as the MTD co-maintainer merged 63 patches, Alexandre Belloni merged 22 patches, and Grégory Clement 6 patches.

Here are the details of our contributions to Linux 5.13:

Bootlin contributions to Linux 5.12

Yes, Linux 5.13 was released yesterday, but we never published the blog post detailing our contributions to Linux 5.12, so let’s do this now! First of all the usual links to the excellent LWN.net articles on the 5.12 merge window: part 1 and part 2.

LWN.net also published an article with Linux 5.12 development statistics, and two Bootlin engineers made their way to the statistics: Alexandre Belloni in the list of top contributors by number of changesets, with 69 commits, and Paul Kocialkowski in the list of top contributors by number of changed lines, with over 6000 lines changed.

Here are the highlights of our contributions:

  • Addition of a new driver for the Silvaco I3C master controller. This was contributed by Miquèl Raynal, who became the maintainer for this driver. Bootlin has pioneered support for I3C in Linux, by introducing the complete drivers/i3c subsystem a few years ago, together with the first controller driver, for a Cadence IP, see our blog post from 2018.
  • Addition of two new camera sensor drivers, one for the Omnivision OV5648 and another for the Omnivision OV8865. These were contributed by Paul Kocialkowski.
  • Implementation of mqprio support in the Marvell Ethernet controller driver mvneta, see this commit. As explained in the tc-mqprio man page, the MQPRIO qdisc is a simple queuing discipline that allows mapping traffic flows to hardware queue ranges using priorities and a configurable priority to traffic class mapping. This was contributed by Maxime Chevallier
  • Improvements in the IIO driver for the ms58xx family of sensors, contributed by Alexandre Belloni.
  • The final removal of the atmel_tclib code, which has been replaced by proper drivers for the TCB timers on Atmel/Microchip ARM platforms over the past few releases, also by Alexandre Belloni.
  • As usual, a large amount of fixes and improvements in the RTC subsystem, by its maintainer Alexandre Belloni.

Here is the detailed list of our contributions to this release:

Slides and videos of Bootlin talks at Live Embedded Event #2

The second edition of Live Embedded Event took place on June 3rd, exactly 6 months after the first edition. Even though there were a few issues with the online platform, it was once again great to learn new things about embedded, and share some of the work we’ve been doing at Bootlin on various topics. For the next edition, we plan to switch to a different online platform, hopefully providing a better experience.

But in the mean time, all videos of the event have been posted on the Youtube Channel of the event. The talks from Bootlin have been posted on Bootlin’s Youtube Channel.

Indeed, in addition to being part of the organization committee, Bootlin prepared and delivered 5 talks as part of Live Embedded Event, covering different topics we have worked on in the recent months for our customers.

Understanding U-Boot Falcon Mode and adding support for new boards, Michael Opdenacker

Slides [PDF]

Introduction to RAUC, Kamel Bouhara

Slides [PDF]

Security vulnerability tracking tools in Buildroot, Thomas Petazzoni

Slides [PDF]

Secure boot in embedded Linux systems, Thomas Perrot

Slides [PDF]

Device Tree overlays and U-boot extension board management, Köry Maincent

Slides [PDF]

Upcoming online training courses in 2021

Online training courseThroughout this first half of 2021, our online training courses available for individual registration have been very popular. We have added some new dates for this summer and early fall for all our courses:

You can register directly online through Eventbrite and pay by credit card, or request an invoice. Note that our sessions are regularly full: our embedded Linux training course next month is full one month before the session, so make sure to book your seat early enough. We offer a 100 EUR early bird discount for registrations taking place at least one month before the course.

These courses are delivered entirely online: you don’t need any hardware to participate, as the hands-on labs are replaced by live demonstrations made by the trainer. All you need is a web browser, a good Internet connection and an audio headset!

We can also organize private courses upon request, if you have a larger group of engineers to train on these topics. Contact us for details!