Live Embedded Event schedule published, 5 talks from Bootlin

The schedule for the next edition of Live Embedded Event has been published! This 100% online and free conference will take place on June 3rd, 2021. Thanks to the proposals received, the event will feature 4 tracks during the entire day, covering a wide range of topics: hardware for embedded systems, embedded Linux, RTOS, IoT, FPGA, RISC-V, and more.

Live Embedded Event #2 agenda
Live Embedded Event #2 agenda

Bootlin is once again part of the organization team for this event, and in addition 5 talks proposed by Bootlin have been selected into the schedule. See below the details of our talks.

Understanding U-Boot Falcon Mode and adding support for new boards, Michael Opdenacker

The Falcon Mode is a U-Boot feature that allows to directly load the operating system kernel from the first stage of U-Boot (a.k.a. “SPL”), skipping the second stage of U-Boot. Doing this can save up to 1 second in the boot process, and this way, you can keep a full featured U-Boot that you can still fall back to for maintenance or development needs. However, using Falcon Mode is not always easy, as it requires extra code that most boards supported by U-Boot don’t have yet. At Bootlin, we had to add such support to U-Boot for several boards. This presentation will explain how Falcon Mode booting actually works in U-Boot and the implementation and usage choices made by U-Boot developers. It will show you how to add such Falcon Mode support to U-Boot for your own board.

Banner LEE for Michael Opdenacker's talk

Talk given by Michael Opdenacker, at 10:00 AM CEST on June 3rd, 2021.

Link to the talk (registration required).

Introduction to RAUC, Kamel Bouhara

In embedded systems, deploying firmware updates in the field has now become an obvious requirement, to ensure that security vulnerabilities are addressed, that bugs are fixed, and new functionalities can be delivered to the users. Among a range of different open-source solutions, RAUC provides an interesting firmware update mechanism for embedded system. In this talk, we will introduce the main features of RAUC, its integration in build systems such as Buildroot or the Yocto Project, as well as its integration with the U-Boot and Barebox bootloaders. Finally we will explore some common update scenarios that are fully supported by RAUC features.

Banner LEE for Kamel Bouhara's talk

Talk given by Kamel Bouhara, at 3:30 PM CEST on June 3rd, 2021.

Link to the talk (registration required).

Security vulnerability tracking tools in Buildroot, Thomas Petazzoni

Buildroot is a popular and easy to use embedded Linux build system. With the increasing concern around security vulnerabilities affecting embedded systems, and the need to keep them updated, Buildroot has been extended with new tooling for security vulnerability tracking. This tooling allows to monitor the CVEs that affect the packages present in Buildroot. In this talk, we will introduce the principle of CVEs and CPEs, present the tools now available in Buildroot to help keep track of the security vulnerabilities, show how they can be used for a project and identify the current limitations of this tooling.

Banner for LEE's talk from Thomas Petazzoni

Talk given by Thomas Petazzoni, at 1:30 PM CEST on June 3rd, 2021.

Link to the talk (registration required).

Secure boot in embedded Linux systems, Thomas Perrot

Secure boot is a integrity mechanism, based on signature verification, that allows to detect software corruption or malicious code, during the boot process. Implementing secure boot is not always obvious, as it requires multiple stages of verification, at the bootloader, Linux kernel and root filesystem level, as well as integration into the build system, CI infrastructure, firmware upgrade mechanism, and more. Based on a recent experience to bring secure boot on an NXP i.MX8 platform, Thomas will present how to implement the chain of trust from the SoC ROM code to the root filesystem, as well as other considerations related to the implementation of secure boot. While the presentation will use the i.MX8 as an example, most of the discussion will apply to other platforms as well.

Banner for LEE's talk from Thomas Perrot

Talk given by Thomas Perrot, at 3:30 PM CEST on June 3rd, 2021.

Link to the talk (registration required).

Device Tree overlays and U-boot extension board management, Köry Maincent

In this talk, we will start by introducing the mechanism of Device Tree Overlays, which are a way of extending the Device Tree itself to describe additional hardware. We will show how Device Tree Overlays are written, compiled, and applied to a base Device Tree, and what is the status of Device Tree Overlays support in U-Boot and Linux. We will take the example of the BeagleBoard.org project, showing how Device Tree overlays are used to make CAPE extension boards compatible with different boards. Finally, we will describe our proposal, already submitted to the community, to add an extension board management facility to U-Boot, which automatically detects, loads and applies the appropriate Device Tree Overlays depending on the extension boards that are detected.

Banner for LEE's talk from Köry Maincent

Talk given by Köry Maincent, at 1:30 PM CEST on June 3rd, 2021.

Link to the talk (registration required).

Videos and slides of Bootlin presentations at FOSDEM 2021

The videos from Bootlin’s presentations earlier this month at FOSDEM 2021 are now publicly available. Once again, FOSDEM was a busy event, even if it was online for once. As in most technical conferences, Bootlin engineers volunteered to share their experience and research by giving two talks.

Maxime Chevallier – Network Performance in the Linux Kernel, Getting the most out of the Hardware

Abstract: The networking stack is one of the most complex and optimized subsystems in the Linux kernel, and for a good reason. Between the wild range of applications, the complexity and variety of the networking hardware, getting good performance while keeping the stack easily usable from userspace has been a long-standing challenge.

Nowadays, complex Network Interface Controllers (NICs) can be found even on small embedded systems, bringing powerful features that were previously found only in the server world closest to day to day users.

This is a good opportunity to dive into the Linux Networking stack, to discover what is used to make networking as fast as possible, both by using all the features of the hardware and by implementing some clever software tricks.

In this talk, we cover these various techniques, ranging from simple batch processing with NAPI, queue management with RSS, RPS, XPS and so on, flow steering and filtering with ethool and TC, to finish with the newest big change that is XDP.

We dive into these various techniques and see how to configure them to squeeze the most out of your hardware, and discover that what was previously in the realm of datacenters and huge computers can now also be applied to embedded linux development.

Here are PDF slides for this presentation.

Michael Opdenacker – Embedded Linux from Scratch in 45 minutes, on RISC-V

Abstract: Discover how to build your own embedded Linux system completely from scratch. In this presentation and tutorial, we show how to build a custom toolchain (Buildroot), bootloader (opensbi / U-Boot) and kernel (Linux), that one can run on a system with the new RISV-V open Instruction Set Architecture emulated by QEMU. We also show how one can build a minimal root filesystem by oneself thanks to the BusyBox project. The presentation ends by showing how to control the system remotely through a tiny webserver. The approach is to provide only the files that are strictly necessary. That’s all the interest of embedded Linux: one can really control and understand everything that runs on the system, and see how simple the system can be. That’s much easier than trying to understand how a GNU/Linux system works from a distribution as complex as Debian!

The presentation also shares details about what’s specific to the RISC-V architecture, in particular about the various stages of the boot process. This presentation shares all the hardware (!), source code build instructions and demo binaries needed to reproduce everything at home, and add specific improvements. Most of the details are also useful to people using other hardware architectures (in particular arm and arm64).

It’s probably the first time a tutorial manages to show so many aspects of embedded Linux in less than an hour. See by yourself! At least, that’s for sure the first one demonstrating how to boot Linux from U-Boot in a RISC-V system emulated by QEMU.

Here are PDF slides for this presentation.

Bootlin at FOSDEM 2021: two talks, member of Embedded program committee

FOSDEM21Like all conferences in these times, FOSDEM will take place as an online, virtual event. For all the FOSDEM regular attendees, it will certainly be a very different experience, and for sure, we will all miss the chocolate, waffles, beer, mussels as well as the rainy, muddy, snowy, foggy and cold weather that characterize Brussels in early February. But nevertheless, knowledge sharing and discussions must go on, and FOSDEM will take place! As usual, FOSDEM takes place the first week-end of February, on February 6-7, and the event is completely free, with no registration required.

This time around, Bootlin is once again contributing to FOSDEM:

Make sure to check out the rest of the Embedded Devroom schedule, as well as the overall FOSDEM schedule.

Videos and slides from Bootlin talks at Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2020

The Embedded Linux Conference Europe took place online last week. While we definitely missed the experience of an in-person event, we strongly participated to this conference with no less than 7 talks on various topics showing Bootlin expertise in different fields: Linux kernel development in networking, multimedia and storage, but also build systems and tooling. We’re happy to be publishing now the slides and videos of our talks.

From the camera sensor to the user: the journey of a video frame, Maxime Chevallier

Download the slides: PDF, source.

OpenEmbedded and Yocto Project best practices, Alexandre Belloni

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Supporting hardware-accelerated video encoding with mainline Linux, Paul Kocialkowski

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Building embedded Debian/Ubuntu systems with ELBE, Köry Maincent

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Understand ECC support for NAND flash devices in Linux, Miquèl Raynal

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Using Visual Studio Code for Embedded Linux Development, Michael Opdenacker

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Precision Time Protocol (PTP) and packet timestamping in Linux, Antoine Ténart

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Live Embedded Event: a new online conference

Live Embedded EventIn these times of COVID19, pretty much all of the existing conferences have moved to an online format. For example, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe is going to take place next week, online, and Bootlin will significantly contribute to the event with no less than 7 talks on a wide range of topics.

But this trend for online conferences has also spurred the creation of new events. And specifically, we’re happy to announce the creation of a new conference oriented towards our favorite topic of embedded systems: Live Embedded Event. It will take place online on December 3 and will have a broader range of topics covered than ELC typically has, as Live Embedded Event is open to non-Linux embedded topics, hardware platform and interfaces discussions, and more.

The event is mainly organized by four French companies specialized in embedded systems, and we expect the contents to be a mix of talks in English and in French. Speaking of contents, the Call For Papers is open until November 10, so you can have the chance to share your knowledge about embedded topics, show your expertise, and meet new users and customers. And of course, you can also simply register as an attendee: the event is free !

Important links: