Videos and slides from Bootlin talks at Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2020

The Embedded Linux Conference Europe took place online last week. While we definitely missed the experience of an in-person event, we strongly participated to this conference with no less than 7 talks on various topics showing Bootlin expertise in different fields: Linux kernel development in networking, multimedia and storage, but also build systems and tooling. We’re happy to be publishing now the slides and videos of our talks.

From the camera sensor to the user: the journey of a video frame, Maxime Chevallier

Download the slides: PDF, source.

OpenEmbedded and Yocto Project best practices, Alexandre Belloni

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Supporting hardware-accelerated video encoding with mainline Linux, Paul Kocialkowski

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Building embedded Debian/Ubuntu systems with ELBE, Köry Maincent

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Understand ECC support for NAND flash devices in Linux, Miquèl Raynal

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Using Visual Studio Code for Embedded Linux Development, Michael Opdenacker

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Precision Time Protocol (PTP) and packet timestamping in Linux, Antoine Ténart

Download the slides: PDF, source.

Live Embedded Event: a new online conference

Live Embedded EventIn these times of COVID19, pretty much all of the existing conferences have moved to an online format. For example, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe is going to take place next week, online, and Bootlin will significantly contribute to the event with no less than 7 talks on a wide range of topics.

But this trend for online conferences has also spurred the creation of new events. And specifically, we’re happy to announce the creation of a new conference oriented towards our favorite topic of embedded systems: Live Embedded Event. It will take place online on December 3 and will have a broader range of topics covered than ELC typically has, as Live Embedded Event is open to non-Linux embedded topics, hardware platform and interfaces discussions, and more.

The event is mainly organized by four French companies specialized in embedded systems, and we expect the contents to be a mix of talks in English and in French. Speaking of contents, the Call For Papers is open until November 10, so you can have the chance to share your knowledge about embedded topics, show your expertise, and meet new users and customers. And of course, you can also simply register as an attendee: the event is free !

Important links:

Feedback from the Netdev 0x13 conference

The Netdev 0x13 conference took place last week in Prague, Czech Republic. As we work on a variety of networking topics as part of our Linux kernel contributions, Bootlin engineers Maxime Chevallier and Antoine Ténart went to meet with the Linux networking community and to see a lot of interesting sessions. It’s the third time we enjoy attending the Netdev conference (after Netdev 2.1 and Netdev 2.2) and as always, it was a blast!

The 3-day conference started with a first day of workshops and tutorials. We enjoyed learning how to be the cool kids thanks to the XDP hands-on tutorial where Jesper Brouer and Toke Høiland-Jørgensen cooked us a number of lessons to progressively get to learn how to write and load XDP programs. This was the first trial-run of the tutorial which is meant to be extended and used as a material to go through the XDP basics. The instructions are all available on Github.

We then had the chance to attend the TC workshop where face to face discussions and presentations of the traffic control hot topics being worked on happened. The session caught our attention as the topic is related to current subjects being worked on at Bootlin.

Being used to work on embedded systems, seeing the problems the Network developers face can sometimes come as a surprise. During the TC workshop, Vlad Buslov presented his recent work on removing TC flower’s the dependency to the global rtnl lock, which is an issue when you have a million classification rules to update quickly.

We also went to the hardware offload workshop. The future of the network offload APIs and support in the Linux kernel was discussed, with various topics ranging from ASIC support to switchev advanced use-cases or offloading XDP. This was very interesting to us as we do work on various networking engines providing many offloading facilities to the kernel.

The next two days were a collection of talks presenting the recent advances in the networking subsystem of the Linux kernel, as well as current issues and real-world examples of recent functionalities being leveraged.

As always XDP was brought-up with a presentation of XDP offloading using virtio-net, recent advances in combining XDP and hardware offloading techniques and a feedback from Cloudflare using XDP in their DDOS mitigation in-house solution.

But we also got to see other topics, such as SO_TIMESTAMPING being used for performance analytics. In this talk Soheil Hassas Yeganeh presented how the kernel timestamping facilities can be used to track individual packets withing the networking stack for performance analysis and debugging. This was nice to see as we worked on enabling hardware timestamping in networking engines and PHYs for our clients.

Another hot topic this year was the QUIC protocol, which was presented in details in the very good QUIC tutorial by Jana Iyengar. Since this protocol is fairly new, it was brought-up in several sessions from a lot of interesting angles.

Although QUIC was not the main subject of Alissa Cooper’s keynote on Open Source, the IETF, and You, she explained how QUIC was an example of a protocol that is designed alongside its implementations, having a tight feedback loop between the protocol specifications and its usage in real-life. Alissa shared Jana’s point on how middle-boxes are a problem when designing and deploying new protocols, and explained that an approach to overcome this “ossification” is to encrypt the protocol header themselves and document the invariant parts of the non-encrypted parts.

A consequence of having a flexible protocol is that it is not meant to be implemented in the kernel. However, Maciej Machnikowski and Joshua Hay explained that it is still possible to offload some of the processing to hardware, which sparked interesting discussions with the audience on how to do so.

Conclusion

The Netdev 0x13 conference was well organized and very pleasant to attend. The content was deeply technical and allowed us to stay up-to-date with the latest developments. We also had interesting discussions and came back with lots of ideas to explore.

Thanks for organizing Netdev, we had an amazing time!

Bootlin at the Buildroot Developers Meeting, February 2019

Buildroot logoIt’s now a tradition: the Buildroot project organizes one of its Buildroot Developers Meeting right after the FOSDEM conference. 2019 was no exception, and the meeting took place from February 4 to February 6, a three days duration, instead of the traditional two days duration from the previous years. Once again, the meeting was sponsored by Google, who provided the meeting location and lunch for all participants. Bootlin participated to the event, by allowing its engineer Thomas Petazzoni to join the meeting.

The meeting was a mix of discussions on various topics and actual hacking, with a focus on reducing the backlog of pending patches. The report synthetizes the most important discussion items:

  • A short general assembly of the Buildroot Association took place
  • Some discussions around the download infrastructure took place, related to the re-introduction of the make source-check feature and the issue of tarball reproducibility with version control system download backends
  • Discussion about introducing Config.in options for all host packages, an idea that we decided to not pursue for the moment.
  • Discussion about the instrumentation hooks that are used to collect the list of files installed by packages, and how we can achieve this goal in a way that is both efficient and reliable
  • Discussion on which Qt5 versions to support
  • Discussion on participating to the Google Summer of Code. We wrote a few topic ideas and applied as an organization for GSoC 2019.
  • Discussion on how to integrate support for systemd sysusers mechanism

Reading the work on the pending patches, we managed to reduce the backlog from about 300 patches to around 170 patches, which is a very significant achievement.

From left to right: Mark Corbin, Adam Duskett, Angelo Compagnucci (front), Peter Korsgaard (back), Thomas Petazzoni (front), Arnout Vandecappelle (back), Thomas De Schampheleire, Adrian Perez de Castro and Titouan Christophe. Behind the camera: Yann E. Morin.

More specifically, Thomas Petazzoni took advantage of this meeting to:

  • Finalize his work on the pkg-stats script, to include details about the latest available upstream version of each Buildroot package. To do so, it relies on information provided by the release-monitoring.org website. The information is not yet accurate for all packages, but the accuracy can be improved by contributing to release-monitoring.org. The updated package statistics page now provides those details, which will help ensure Buildroot packages are kept up-to-date.
  • Review in detail the patch series from Adam Duskett introducing support for GObject Introspection. It is far from a trivial package due to the need to run during the build some small binaries using Qemu. While the series is not merged yet, we have a much better understanding of it, which will help complete the review process.
  • Do a final review and apply the lengthy patch series reworking the fftw package.
  • Participate, as a Buildroot co-maintainer, to the pending patches backlog cleanup, by reviewing and/or merging a significant number of patches.

It was once again a very nice and productive meeting. The next meeting will take place as usual around the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, in October, in Lyon (France).

Feedback from Bootlin at the Linux Plumbers Conference 2018

The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) was held a few weeks ago in Vancouver, BC. As always there were several tracks where contributors gave a presentation of on-going or future work, and discussed it with the audience, on specific topics such as thermal, containers, real time, device tree and many more. For the first time at LPC a 2-day networking track took place. As we work on a diversity of networking projects at Bootlin we decided to attend.

Networking track at LPC. Photo @linuxplumbers.

The hot topic of the last couple of years in conferences in the network subsystem is XDP, so the conference was not exception. We saw a handful of talks and discussions about the on-going work and support of XDP within the kernel. XDP provides a programmable network data path (using eBPF) in the Linux kernel to process bare metal packets at the lowest point in the network stack. Packets are processed directly in the drivers’ Rx queues, before any allocation happen (such as socket buffers). Facebook is one well known heavy user of this technology (every packet toward Facebook is processed by XDP) and its engineers gave feedback about how they use XDP and the issues they faced. Other projects and companies are currently evaluating and starting to use XDP as well: we also saw presentations about XDP/eBPF in Open vSwitch, DPDK or kTLS.

While XDP/eBPF was featured in most of the discussions, other interesting topics where brought up. Andrew Lunn gave a presentation about the current need to go beyond 1G copper PHYs for many Linux enabled embedded devices. This was very interesting for us as we used and worked on the technologies used within the Linux kernel to address this, such as Phylink and the SFP bus (we used those when enabling 10G interfaces in the Marvell MacchiatoBin board).

Another presentation caught our attention as the topic was related to what we do at Bootlin. Jesse Brandeburg from Intel talked about the networking hardware offloads and their APIs. He exposed a brief history of the offloads supported by NICs and then showed some issues with the current APIs, where some use cases or behaviors are not clearly defined and sometimes overlap. This is a feeling we share as we experienced it while implementing some of those hardware networking offloads. Jesse’s idea was to open a discussion to come up with better solutions within the next years, as NICs offloading continue to grow.

The Linux Plumbers Conference was very pleasant and well organized. We had the chance to attend the networking track, seeing lots of great cutting-edge topics being discussed; as well as other interesting tracks.

We’d like to thank the conference and track organizers, we had a great time! Videos, slides and papers are now available on the official website or on Youtube.