Embedded Linux Conference 2021 schedule published, 4 talks from Bootlin

The schedule for the Embedded Linux Conference 2021 has been published and features 4 talks proposed by Bootlin !

This year, the ELC will take place in Seatle but will be organised as a hybrid virtual/physical event  due to the pandemic.  As usual the ELC will have a really interesting schedule with 46 talks covering a wide range of topics: build system, kernel graphics, boot process, security, etc.

See below the details of Bootlin talks that will be presented as virtual talks.

Advanced Camera Support on Allwinner SoCs with Mainline Linux – Paul Kocialkowski, Bootlin

Capturing pixels with a camera involves a number of steps, from the ADC reading the photosites in the image sensor to the final pixel values that are ready for encode/display, with various processing and transmission taking place along the way. While simple cases put most of the heavy lifting on the image sensor’s side (through its embedded processor) and use a simple parallel bus for transmission, advanced cases require more work to be done outside of the sensor. In addition, modern high-speed transmission buses also bring-in more complexity. This talk will present how support for such an advanced use case was integrated into the mainline Linux kernel, using the Media and V4L2 APIs. It involves supporting a sensor using the raw Bayer RGB format, transmission over the MIPI CSI-2 bus as well as support for the Image Signal Processor (ISP) found on Allwinner platforms. A specific focus will be set on this ISP, with details about the features it implements as well as the internal and userspace APIs that are used to support it. The integration between all of the involved components will also be highlighted.

Talk given by Paul Kocialkowski, at 4:50 PM PDT on September 27, 2021. See this talk in the schedule.

Embedded Linux Nuggets found in Buildroot Package Eldorado

To this date, Buildroot supports more than 2,500 packages, selected for the ability to run them on embedded Linux systems. We’ve gone exploring this Eldorado, and came back with multiple nuggets of all shapes and colors. Join this playful presentation and as if you were still a new comer to the embedded Linux community, discover lesser known tools and resources that can add to the functionality of your systems or make your life as a developer easier and more fun. Whenever possible, each resource will be shown through a quick demonstration or video capture. During this talk, I’ll also open an Etherpad for all participants to share their favorite solutions with the rest of the audience, especially the ones that deserve to be better known, and could be worth supporting in Buildroot too. We will close the session by an open review and discussion based on the nuggets shared by the audience.

Michael Opdenacker

Talk given by Michael Opdenacker, at 12:00 PM PDT on September 28, 2021. See this talk in the schedule.

I3C in Tomorrow’s Design

I3C is the new bus specification by the MIPI Alliance. While being compatible with I2C devices, this bus brings a colorful set of new features such as dynamic address assignment, in-band interrupts, hot-join, master handover and many others. It was improved once again recently with the 1.1 version of the specification which brought timer based sampling synchronization and targeted reset. All this make the I3C bus a good candidate for a number of new situations compared to its I2C cousin. It is then more and more being included in new hardware designs. With this talk we would like to propose a reminder of the various components and concepts of this relatively new bus. We will then detail how it is implemented in the Linux kernel with a short guided tour in the I3C core. Since the previous talk on I3C in 2018 by Boris Brezillon, I3C has now become a reality and starts to become available in real hardware designs. This talk will recap the basics of I3C as well as add details of the 1.1 specification and improvements in the Linux support.

Miquèl Raynal

Talk given by Miquèl Raynal, at 4:00 PM PDT on September 28, 2021. See this talk in the schedule.

OP-TEE: When Linux Loses Control

OP-TEE is an open-source Trusted Execution Environment designed to be executed in a secure context as a companion to a non secure Linux system. But what happens to the peripherals control since OP-TEE can forbid the non-secure OS to access them ? When running with a TEE, Linux isn’t in charge anymore of some critical peripherals and relies on the TEE to access and configure them. There are multiple protocols and methods to access these peripherals that are supported by Linux (SCMI, PSCI, SMC). Supporting them for a SoC requires understanding the various interactions between the systems and how to modify them to fit that new control scheme. Additionally, the configuration must be passed from OP-TEE to Linux to allow a seamless integration. This talk will cover the boot process to start a secure system and the modifications needed to run Linux when OP-TEE is in charge of some peripherals. The work that has been done for a specific SoC will be described to have a tangible real-world use-case.

Clément Léger

Talk given by Clément Léger, at 12:00 PM PDT on September 29, 2021. See this talk in the schedule.

Slides and videos of Bootlin talks at Live Embedded Event #2

The second edition of Live Embedded Event took place on June 3rd, exactly 6 months after the first edition. Even though there were a few issues with the online platform, it was once again great to learn new things about embedded, and share some of the work we’ve been doing at Bootlin on various topics. For the next edition, we plan to switch to a different online platform, hopefully providing a better experience.

But in the mean time, all videos of the event have been posted on the Youtube Channel of the event. The talks from Bootlin have been posted on Bootlin’s Youtube Channel.

Indeed, in addition to being part of the organization committee, Bootlin prepared and delivered 5 talks as part of Live Embedded Event, covering different topics we have worked on in the recent months for our customers.

Understanding U-Boot Falcon Mode and adding support for new boards, Michael Opdenacker

Slides [PDF]

Introduction to RAUC, Kamel Bouhara

Slides [PDF]

Security vulnerability tracking tools in Buildroot, Thomas Petazzoni

Slides [PDF]

Secure boot in embedded Linux systems, Thomas Perrot

Slides [PDF]

Device Tree overlays and U-boot extension board management, Köry Maincent

Slides [PDF]

Bootlin “Buildroot system development” course updated to Buildroot 2021.02

Bootlin has been offering for several years a Buildroot system development course, which allows engineers interested in learning and understanding the Buildroot embedded Linux build system to get up to speed very quickly.

In preparation for our public Buildroot system development course next week, we updated our training materials, both slides and labs to Buildroot 2021.02, which is the latest stable Buildroot release as of today, and is also a Long Term Support release.

Buildroot slide

In addition to updating to a newer Buildroot version, we also use newer U-Boot and Linux versions for the practical labs on BeagleBone Black Wireless. The slides were also updated to document some new features that appeared between 2020.02 and 2021.02. If you’re interested, check out the materials on the training page.

We have one seat left for this training course next week, which will be taught by long-time Buildroot contributor and developer Thomas Petazzoni. Register now and take the last seat!

Bootlin toolchains integration in Buildroot

Since 2017, Bootlin is freely providing ready-to-use pre-built cross-compilation toolchains at https://toolchains.bootlin.com/. We are now providing over 150 toolchains, for a wide range of CPU architectures, covering the glibc, uClibc-ng and musl C libraries, with up-to-date gcc, binutils, gdb and C library support.

We recently contributed an improvement to Buildroot that allows those toolchains to very easily be used in Buildroot configurations: the Bootlin toolchains are now all known by Buildroot as existing external toolchains, next to toolchains from other vendors such as ARM, Synopsys and others.

If you are building a Buildroot system for a CPU architecture variant that has a matching toolchain available from bootlin.toolchains.com, then Bootlin toolchains will naturally show up in the Toolchain sub-menu, when the selected Toolchain type is External toolchain. For example, if the selected CPU architecture is ARM little endian Cortex-A9, with VFP you will see:

Bootlin toolchain selection

Once Bootlin toolchains is selected, a new sub-option Bootlin toolchain variant appears, which allows to choose between the different toolchains applicable to the selected CPU architecture:

Bootlin toolchain choice

This hopefully should make Bootlin toolchains easier to use for Buildroot users.

Internally, this support for Bootlin toolchains in Buildroot is generated and updated using the support/scripts/gen-bootlin-toolchains script. In addition to making the toolchains available to the user, it allows generates some Buildroot test cases for each toolchain, so that each of those configuration is tested by Buildroot continuous integration, see support/testing/tests/toolchain/test_external_bootlin.py.

Bootlin toolchains 2020.08 released

Bootlin toolchainsWe are happy to announce a new release of the freely available cross-compilation toolchains we provide at toolchains.bootlin.com, version 2020.08-1.

Here are the main changes compared to our previous 2020.02 release:

  • Bleeding edge toolchains are now using: gcc 10.2, binutils 2.34, gdb 9.2, kernel headers 5.4, glibc 2.31, musl 1.2.0, uclibc-ng 1.0.34
  • Stable toolchains are using: gcc 9.3, binutils 2.33, gdb 8.3, kernel headers 4.9, glibc 2.31, musl 1.2.0, uclibc-ng 1.0.34
  • Fortran support has been enabled in all tolchains
  • Several new CPU architecture variants are supported, each with a new toolchain
  • Boot testing in Qemu was added for PowerPC64 E5500, NIOSII and m68k MCF5208.

In addition, it is worth mentioning that all those Bootlin toolchains are now directly accessible from Buildroot: make menuconfig shows the Bootlin toolchains available for the current selected CPU architecture, and Buildroot is able to automatically download and use the toolchain. This feature will be available starting from Buildroot 2020.11:

Thanks again to the entire Buildroot community, and especially Romain Naour, for all the fixes and improvements related to toolchain support that make this project possible. In the next weeks, we hope to be able to deliver further updated bleeding-edge toolchains, with glibc 2.32 and binutils 2.35. Stay tuned!

If you face any issue, or need additional features in those toolchains, do not hesitate to report an issue in our issue tracker.