Bootlin contributes SquashFS support to U-Boot

SquashFS is a very popular read-only compressed root filesystem, widely used in embedded systems. It has been supported in the Linux kernel for many years, but so far the U-Boot bootloader did not have support for SquashFS, so it was not possible to load a kernel image or a Device Tree Blob from a SquashFS filesystem in U-Boot.

Between February 2020 and August 2020, João Marcos Costa from the ENSICAEN engineering school, has worked at Bootlin as an intern. João’s internship goal was specifically to implement and contribute to U-Boot the support for the SquashFS filesystem. We are happy to announce that João’s effort has now completed, as the support for SquashFS is now in upstream U-Boot. It can be found in fs/squashfs/ in the U-Boot source code.

More specifically, João’s contributions have been:

In addition to those contributions already merged, João has also submitted for inclusion the support for LZO and ZSTD decompression support.

Practically speaking, this SquashFS support works very much like the support for other filesystems. At build time, you need to enable the CONFIG_FS_SQUASHFS option for the SquashFS driver itself, and CONFIG_CMD_SQUASHFS for the SquashFS U-Boot commands. Once enabled, in U-Boot, you get:

=> sqfsls     
sqfsls - List files in directory. Default: root (/).
 
Usage:
sqfsls  [] [directory]
    - list files from 'dev' on 'interface' in 'directory'
 
=> sqfsload 
sqfsload - load binary file from a SquashFS filesystem
 
Usage:
sqfsload  [ [ [ [bytes [pos]]]]]
    - Load binary file 'filename' from 'dev' on 'interface'
      to address 'addr' from SquashFS filesystem.
      'pos' gives the file position to start loading from.
      If 'pos' is omitted, 0 is used. 'pos' requires 'bytes'.
      'bytes' gives the size to load. If 'bytes' is 0 or omitted,
      the load stops on end of file.
      If either 'pos' or 'bytes' are not aligned to
      ARCH_DMA_MINALIGN then a misaligned buffer warning will
      be printed and performance will suffer for the load.

sqfsls is obviously used to list files, here the list of files from a typical Linux root filesystem:

=> sqfsls mmc 0:1
            bin/
            boot/
            dev/
            etc/
            lib/
    <SYM>   lib32
    <SYM>   linuxrc
            media/
            mnt/
            opt/
            proc/
            root/
            run/
            sbin/
            sys/
            tmp/
            usr/
            var/
 
2 file(s), 16 dir(s)

And then you can use sqfsload to load files, which we illustrate here by loading a Linux kernel image and Device Tree blob, and booting this kernel:

=> sqfsload mmc 0:1 $kernel_addr_r /boot/zImage
6160384 bytes read in 433 ms (13.6 MiB/s)
=> sqfsload mmc 0:1 0x81000000 /boot/am335x-boneblack.dtb
40817 bytes read in 11 ms (3.5 MiB/s)
=> setenv bootargs console=ttyO0,115200n8
=> bootz $kernel_addr_r - 0x81000000
## Flattened Device Tree blob at 81000000
   Booting using the fdt blob at 0x81000000
   Loading Device Tree to 8fff3000, end 8fffff70 ... OK
 
Starting kernel ...
 
[    0.000000] Booting Linux on physical CPU 0x0
[    0.000000] Linux version 4.19.79 (joaomcosta@joaomcosta-Latitude-E7470) (gcc version 7.3.1 20180425 [linaro-7.3-2018.05 revision d29120a424ecfbc167ef90065c0eeb7f91977701] (Linaro GCC 7.3-2018.05)) #1 SMP Fri May 29 18:26:39 CEST 2020
[    0.000000] CPU: ARMv7 Processor [413fc082] revision 2 (ARMv7), cr=10c5387d

Of course, the SquashFS driver is still fresh, and there is a chance that more extensive and widespread testing will uncover a few bugs or limitations, which we’re sure the broader U-Boot community will help address. Overall, we’re really happy to have contributed this new functionality to U-Boot, it will be useful for our projects, and we hope it will be useful to many others in the embedded Linux community!

Linux 5.8 released: Bootlin contributions

Linux 5.8 was released recently. See our usual resources for a good coverage of the highlights of this new release: KernelNewbies page, LWN.net article on the first part of the merge window, LWN.net article on the second part of the merge window.

On our side, we contributed a total of 155 commits to Linux 5.8, which makes Bootlin the 19th contributing company by number of commits according to Linux Kernel Patch Statistic. The highlights of our contributions are:

  • Miquèl Raynal contributed a completely new NAND controller driver: the arasan-nand-controller driver, used on Xilinx platforms.
  • In the MTD subsystem, Miquèl Raynal, as one of the co-maintainers, made a substantial number of contributions: cleanups in the nandsim driver, drop of the nand_release() API, support in the NAND core for the specificities of the arasan-nand-controller driver in terms of ECC handling (we will soon publish a blog post on this topic!)
  • On the support of Atmel/Microchip platforms
    • Alexandre Belloni migrated the SAMA5D3, AT91SAM9N12, AT91RM9200 and AT91SAM9G45 Device Tree files to use the new clock DT bindings
    • Grégory Clement modified the atmel_usba_udc USB device controller driver to no longer require describing all USB endpoints in the Device Tree, since they are always the same for a given SoC.
  • Grégory Clement contributed a number of improvements and fixes for the n_gsm line discipline driver, which allows to multiplex an UART used to communicate with a GSM modem. These improvements and fixes allowed the n_gsm driver to be fully stable for one of our customers.
  • In the RTC subsystem, Alexandre Belloni (maintainer of that subsystem) did a number of small improvements to various RTC drivers.
  • Antoine Ténart has done a number of improvements in the support for Microchip/Microsemi networking products: improvements to the mscc-miim MDIO driver, improvements to the MSCC Ocelot Ethernet switch driver, improvements to the MSCC Ethernet PHY Driver.

Also, several Bootlin engineers are maintainers of various areas of the Linux kernel:

  • Miquèl Raynal, as the NAND maintainer and MTD co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 57 patches from other contributors
  • Alexandre Belloni, as the RTC maintainer and Microchip platform support co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 54 patches from other contributors
  • Grégory Clement, as the Marvell EBU platform support co-maintainer, reviewed and merged 13 patches from other contributors

Here is the complete list of our contributions:

Linux 5.7 released, Bootlin contributions

We’re late to the party as Linux 5.8 is going to be released in a few weeks, but we never published about our contribution to the current Linux stable release, Linux 5.7, so here is our usual summary! For an overview of the major changes in 5.7, KernelNewbies has a nice summary, as well as LWN, in two parts: part 1 and part 2.

Bootlin contributed 92 commits to this release, a small number of contributions compared to past releases, but nevertheless with some significant work:

  • Antoine Ténart contributed support for offloading the MACsec encryption/decryption to a PHY in the networking stack, as well as the corresponding offloading support for some specific Microchip/Vitesse Ethernet PHYs. See our blog post for more details about this feature.
  • Alexandre Belloni continued converting the Atmel/Microchip platforms to the new clock representation, with this time AT91SAM9G45, SAMA5D3, AT91SAM9N12 and AT91RM9200.
  • Alexandre Belloni, as the RTC subsystem maintainer, again did a lot of cleanup and improvements in multiple RTC drivers.
  • Kamel Bouhara contributed support for I2C recovery for the Atmel/Microchip platforms.

In terms of maintainers activity: Miquèl Raynal, as the MTD co-maintainer, merged 62 patches from other contributors, Alexandre Belloni, the RTC maintainer and Atmel/Microchip platform co-maintainer merged 49 patches from other contributors, while Grégory Clement, as the Marvell EBU platforms co-maintainer, merged 11 patches from other contributors.

Here is the detail of our contributions for 5.7:

Measured boot with a TPM 2.0 in U-Boot

A Trusted Platform Module, in short TPM, is a small piece of hardware designed to provide various security functionalities. It offers numerous features, such as storing secrets, ‘measuring’ boot, and may act as an external cryptographic engine. The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) delivers a document called TPM Interface Specifications (TIS) which describes the architecture of such devices and how they are supposed to behave as well as various details around the concepts.

These TPM chips are either compliant with the first specification (up to 1.2) or the second specification (2.0+). The TPM2.0 specification is not backward compatible and this is the one this post is about. If you need more details, there are many documents available at https://trustedcomputinggroup.org/.

Picture of a TPM wired on an EspressoBin
Trusted Platform Module connected over SPI to Marvell EspressoBin platform

Among the functions listed above, this blog post will focus on the measured boot functionality.

Measured boot principles

Measuring boot is a way to inform the last software stage if someone tampered with the platform. It is impossible to know what has been corrupted exactly, but knowing someone has is already enough to not reveal secrets. Indeed, TPMs offer a small secure locker where users can store keys, passwords, authentication tokens, etc. These secrets are not exposed anywhere (unlike with any standard storage media) and TPMs have the capability to release these secrets only under specific conditions. Here is how it works.

Starting from a root of trust (typically the SoC Boot ROM), each software stage during the boot process (BL1, BL2, BL31, BL33/U-Boot, Linux) is supposed to do some measurements and store them in a safe place. A measure is just a digest (let’s say, a SHA256) of a memory region. Usually each stage will ‘digest’ the next one. Each digest is then sent to the TPM, which will merge this measurement with the previous ones.

The hardware feature used to store and merge these measurements is called Platform Configuration Registers (PCR). At power-up, a PCR is set to a known value (either 0x00s or 0xFFs, usually). Sending a digest to the TPM is called extending a PCR because the chosen register will extend its value with the one received with the following logic:

PCR[x] := sha256(PCR[x] | digest)

This way, a PCR can only evolve in one direction and never go back unless the platform is reset.

In a typical measured boot flow, a TPM can be configured to disclose a secret only under a certain PCR state. Each software stage will be in charge of extending a set of PCRs with digests of the next software stage. Once in Linux, user software may ask the TPM to deliver its secrets but the only way to get them is having all PCRs matching a known pattern. This can only be obtained by extending the PCRs in the right order, with the right digests.

Linux support for TPM devices

A solid TPM 2.0 stack has been around for Linux for quite some time, in the form of the tpm2-tss and tpm2-tools projects. More specifically, a daemon called resourcemgr, is provided by the tpm2-tss project. For people coming from the TPM 1.2 world, this used to be called trousers. One can find some commands ready to be used in the tpm2-tools repository, useful for testing purpose.

From the Linux kernel perspective, there are device drivers for at least SPI chips (one can have a look there at files called tpm2*.c and tpm_tis*.c for implementation details).

Bootlin’s contribution: U-Boot support for TPM 2.0

Back when we worked on this topic in 2018, there was no support for TPM 2.0 in U-Boot, but one of customer needed this support. So we implemented, contributed and upstreamed to U-Boot support for TPM 2.0. Our 32 patches patch series adding TPM 2.0 support was merged, with:

  • SPI TPMs compliant with the TCG TIS v2.0
  • Commands for U-Boot shell to do minimal operations (detailed below)
  • A test framework for regression detection
  • A sandbox TPM driver emulating a fake TPM

In details, our commits related to TPM support in U-Boot:

Details of U-Boot commands

Available commands for v2.0 TPMs in U-Boot are currently:

  • STARTUP
  • SELF TEST
  • CLEAR
  • PCR EXTEND
  • PCR READ
  • GET CAPABILITY
  • DICTIONARY ATTACK LOCK RESET
  • DICTIONARY ATTACK CHANGE PARAMETERS
  • HIERARCHY CHANGE AUTH

With this set of functions, minimal handling is possible with the following sequence.

First, the TPM stack in U-Boot must be initialized with:

> tpm init

Then, the STARTUP command must be sent.

> tpm startup TPM2_SU_CLEAR

To enable full TPM capabilities, one must request to continue the self tests (or do them all again).

> tpm self_test full
> tpm self_test continue

This is enough to pursue measured boot as one just need to extend the PCR as needed, giving 1/ the PCR number and 2/ the address where the digest is stored:

> tpm pcr_extend 0 0x4000000

Reading of the extended value is of course possible with:

> tpm pcr_read 0 0x4000000

Managing passwords is about limiting some commands to be sent without previous authentication. This is also possible with the minimum set of commands recently committed, and there are two ways of implementing it. One is quite complicated and features the use of a token together with cryptographic derivations at each exchange. Another solution, less invasive, is to use a single password. Changing passwords was previously done with a single TAKE OWNERSHIP command, while today a CLEAR must precede a CHANGE AUTH. Each of them may act upon different hierarchies. Hierarchies are some kind of authority level and do not act upon the same commands. For the example, let’s use the LOCKOUT hierarchy: the locking mechanism blocking the TPM for a given amount of time after a number of failed authentications, to mitigate dictionary attacks.

> tpm clear TPM2_RH_LOCKOUT [<pw>]
> tpm change_auth TPM2_RH_LOCKOUT <new_pw> [<old_pw>]

Drawback of this implementation: as opposed to the token/hash solution, there is no protection against packet replay.

Please note that a CLEAR does much more than resetting passwords, it entirely resets the whole TPM configuration.

Finally, Dictionary Attack Mitigation (DAM) parameters can also be changed. It is possible to reset the failure counter (aka. the maximum number of attempts before lockout) as well as to disable the lockout entirely. It is possible to check the parameters have been correctly applied.

> tpm dam_reset [<pw>]
> tpm dam_parameters 0xffff 1 0 [<pw>]
> tpm get_capability 0x0006 0x020e 0x4000000 4

In the above example, the DAM parameters are reset, then the maximum number of tries before lockout is set to 0xffff, the delay before decrementing the failure counter by 1 and the lockout is entirely disabled. These parameters are for testing purpose. The third command is explained in the specification but basically retrieves 4 values starting at capability 0x6, property index 0x20e. It will display first the failure counter, followed by the three parameters previously changed.

Limitation

Although TPMs are meant to be black boxes, U-Boot current support is too light to really protect against replay attacks as one could spoof the bus and resend the exact same packets after taking ownership of the platform in order to get these secrets out. Additional developments are needed in U-Boot to protect against these attacks. Additionally, even with this extra security level, all the above logic is only safe when used in the context of a secure boot environment.

Conclusion

Thanks to this work from Bootlin, U-Boot has basic support for TPM 2.0 devices connected over SPI. Do not hesitate to contact us if you need support or help around TPM 2.0 support, either in U-Boot or Linux.

Configuring ALSA controls from an application

ALSA logoA common task when handling audio on Linux is the need to modify the configuration of the sound card, for example, adjusting the output volume or selecting the capture channels. On an embedded system, it can be enough to simply set the controls once using alsamixer or amixer and then save the configuration with alsactl store. This saves the driver state to the configuration file which, by default, is /var/lib/alsa/asound.state. Once done, this file can be included in the build system and shipped with the root filesystem. Usual distributions already include a script that will invoke alsactl at boot time to restore the settings. If it is not the case, then it is simply a matter of calling alsactl restore.

However, defining a static configuration may not be enough. For example, some codecs have advanced routing features allowing to route the audio channels to different outputs and the application may want to decide at runtime where the audio is going.

Instead of invoking amixer using system(3), even if it is not straightforward, it is possible to directly use the alsa-lib API to set controls.

Let’s start with some required includes:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <alsa/asoundlib.h>

alsa/asoundlib.h is the header that is of interest here as it is where the ALSA API lies. Then we define an id lookup function, which is actually the tricky part. Each control has a unique identifier and to be able to manipulate controls, it is necessary to find this unique identifier. In our sample application, we will be using the control name to do the lookup.

int lookup_id(snd_ctl_elem_id_t *id, snd_ctl_t *handle)
{
	int err;
	snd_ctl_elem_info_t *info;
	snd_ctl_elem_info_alloca(&info);

	snd_ctl_elem_info_set_id(info, id);
	if ((err = snd_ctl_elem_info(handle, info)) < 0) {
		fprintf(stderr, "Cannot find the given element from card\n");
		return err;
	}
	snd_ctl_elem_info_get_id(info, id);

	return 0;
}

This function allocates a snd_ctl_elem_info_t, sets its current id to the one passed as the first argument. At this point, the id only includes the control interface type and its name but not its unique id. The snd_ctl_elem_info() function looks up for the element on the sound card whose handle has been passed as the second argument. Then snd_ctl_elem_info_get_id() updates the id with the now completely filled id.

Then the controls can be modified as follows:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
	int err;
	snd_ctl_t *handle;
	snd_ctl_elem_id_t *id;
	snd_ctl_elem_value_t *value;
	snd_ctl_elem_id_alloca(&id);
	snd_ctl_elem_value_alloca(&value);

This declares and allocates the necessary variables. Allocations are done using alloca so it is not necessary to free them as long as the function exits at some point.

	if ((err = snd_ctl_open(&handle, "hw:0", 0)) < 0) {
		fprintf(stderr, "Card open error: %s\n", snd_strerror(err));
		return err;
	}

Get a handle on the sound card, in this case, hw:0 which is the first sound card in the system.

	snd_ctl_elem_id_set_interface(id, SND_CTL_ELEM_IFACE_MIXER);
	snd_ctl_elem_id_set_name(id, "Headphone Playback Volume");
	if (err = lookup_id(id, handle))
		return err;

This sets the interface type and name of the control we want to modify and then call the lookup function.

	snd_ctl_elem_value_set_id(value, id);
	snd_ctl_elem_value_set_integer(value, 0, 55);
	snd_ctl_elem_value_set_integer(value, 1, 77);

	if ((err = snd_ctl_elem_write(handle, value)) < 0) {
		fprintf(stderr, "Control element write error: %s\n",
			snd_strerror(err));
		return err;
	}

Now, this changes the value of the control. snd_ctl_elem_value_set_id() sets the id of the control to be changed then snd_ctl_elem_value_set_integer() sets the actual value. There are multiple calls because this control has multiple members (in this case, left and right channels). Finally, snd_ctl_elem_write() commits the value.

Note that snd_ctl_elem_value_set_integer() is called directly because we know this control is an integer but it is actually possible to query what kind of value should be used using snd_ctl_elem_info_get_type() on the snd_ctl_elem_info_t. The scale of the integer is also device specific and can be retrieved with the snd_ctl_elem_info_get_min(), snd_ctl_elem_info_get_max() and snd_ctl_elem_info_get_step() helpers.

	snd_ctl_elem_id_clear(id);
	snd_ctl_elem_id_set_interface(id, SND_CTL_ELEM_IFACE_MIXER);
	snd_ctl_elem_id_set_name(id, "Headphone Playback Switch");
	if (err = lookup_id(id, handle))
		return err;

	snd_ctl_elem_value_clear(value);
	snd_ctl_elem_value_set_id(value, id);
	snd_ctl_elem_value_set_boolean(value, 1, 1);

	if ((err = snd_ctl_elem_write(handle, value)) < 0) {
		fprintf(stderr, "Control element write error: %s\n",
			snd_strerror(err));
		return err;
	}

This unmutes the right channel of Headphone playback, this time it is a boolean. The other common kind of element is SND_CTL_ELEM_TYPE_ENUMERATED for enumerated contents. This is used for channel muxing or selecting de-emphasis values for example. snd_ctl_elem_value_set_enumerated() has to be used to set the selected item.

	return 0;
}

This concludes this simple example and should be enough to get you started writing smarter applications that don't rely on external program to configure the sound card controls.