More Improvements to Raspberry Pi Display Testing

Raspberry Pi Display Support and IGT

We have been working with Raspberry Pi for quite some time, especially on areas related to the display side. Our work is part of a larger ongoing effort to move away from using the VC4 firmware for display operations and use native Linux drivers instead, which interact with the hardware directly. This transition is a long process, which requires bringing the native drivers to a point where they are efficient and reliable enough to cover most use cases of Raspberry Pi users.

Continuous Integration (CI) plays an important role in that process, since it allows detecting regressions early in the development cycle. This is why we have been tasked with improving testing in IGT GPU Tools, the test suite for the DRM subsystem of the kernel (which handles display). We already presented the work we conducted for testing various pixel formats with IGT on the Raspberry Pi’s VC4 last year. Since then, we have continued the work on IGT and brought it even further.

Improving YUV and Adding Tiled Pixel Formats Support

We continued the work on pixel formats by generalizing support for YUV buffers and reworking the format conversion helpers to support most of the common YUV formats instead of a reduced number of them. This lead to numerous commits that were merged in IGT:

In the meantime, we have also added support for testing specific tiling modes for display buffers. Tiling modes indicate that the pixel data is laid out in a different fashion than the usual line-after-line linear raster order. It provides more efficient data access to the hardware and yields better performance. They are used by the GPU (T tiling) or the VPU (SAND tiling). This required introducing a few changes to IGT as well as adding helpers for converting to the tiling modes, which was done in the following commits:

DRM Planes Support

The display engine hardware used on the Raspberry Pi allows displaying multiple framebuffers on-screen, in addition to the primary one (where the user interface lives). This feature is especially useful to display video streams directly, without having to perform the composition step with the CPU or GPU. The display engine offers features such as colorspace conversion (for converting YUV to RGB) and scaling, which are usually quite intensive tasks. In the Linux kernel’s DRM subsystem, this ability of the display engine hardware is exposed through DRM planes.

Displaying multiple DRM planes

We worked on adding support for testing DRM planes with the Chamelium board, with a fuzzing test that selects randomized attributes for the planes. Our work lead to the introduction of a new test in IGT:

Dealing with Imperfect Outputs

With the Chamelium, there are two major ways of finding out whether the captured display is correct or not:

  • Comparing the captured frame’s CRC with a CRC calculated from the reference frame;
  • Comparing the pixels in the captured and reference frames.

While the first method is the fastest one (because the captured frame’s CRC is calculated by the Chamelium board directly), it can only work if the framebuffer and the reference are guaranteed to be pixel-perfect. Since HDMI is a digital interface, this is generally the case. But as soon as scaling or colorspace conversion is involved, the algorithms used by the hardware do not result in the exact same pixels as performing the operation on the reference with the CPU.

Because of this issue, we had to come up with a specific checking method that excludes areas where there are such differences. Since our display pattern resembles a colorful checkerboard with solid-filled areas, most of the differences are only noticeable at the edges of each color block. As a result, we introduced a checking method that excludes the checkerboard edges from the comparison.

Detecting the edges (in blue) of a multi-plane pattern

This method turned out to provide good results and very few incorrect results after some tweaking. It was contributed to IGT with commit:

Underrun Detection

We also worked on implementing display pipeline underrun detection in the kernel’s VC4 DRM driver. Underruns occur when too much pixel data is provided (e.g. because of too many DRM planes enabled) and the hardware can’t keep up. In addition, a bandwidth filter was also added to reject configurations that would likely lead to an underrun. This lead to a few commits that were already merged upstream:

We prepared tests in IGT to ensure that the underruns are correctly reported, that the bandwidth protection does its job and that both are consistent. This test was submitted for review with patch:

Linux 5.0 released, Bootlin contributions

Linux 5.0 was released two weeks ago by Linus Torvalds, and as it is now always the case, Bootlin has contributed a number of patches to this release. For an overview of the new features and improvements brought by Linux 5.0, we as usual recommend to read the LWN articles: merge window summary part 1, merge window summary part 2. The KernelNewbies.org page about this kernel release is also nicely documented.

In terms of contribution to Linux 5.0, according to the LWN statistics, Bootlin is the 12th contributing company by number of commits (261 commits), and 8th contributing company by number of changed lines. Bootlin engineer Maxime Ripard is 11th contributing developer by number of commits, and former Bootlin engineer Boris Brezillon is 12th contributing developer by number of commits, and 8th by number of changed lines. In this release, we are also happy to see numerous contributions from Paul Kocialkoswki who joined Bootlin in November 2018 after his internship working on the Linux kernel support for the Allwinner VPU.

Here are the main highlights of our contributions to Linux 5.0:

  • After 1.5 years of work, the I3C subsystem was finally merged and visible in drivers/i3c in your favorite kernel tree! We are proud to have pioneered the Linux kernel support for this new MIPI standard, which aims at providing an alternate solution to I2C and SPI, with interesting new features (higher speed, device discovery and enumeration, in-band interrupts, and more). See also our initial blog post about I3C, and our blog post about I3C being upstream.
  • In the RTC subsystem, Bootlin engineer and RTC kernel maintainer Alexandre Belloni reworked the way nvmem devices are handled, allowing for multiple nvmem devices to be registered for a single RTC as some have both battery-backed RAM and an on-chip EEPROM. devm_rtc_device_register() has been reimplemented to use the new registration path and is now deprecated. Its counterpart, devm_rtc_device_unregister() has been removed.
  • In the MTD subsystem
    • Boris Brezillon contributed a number of patches to the support for raw NAND mainly related to refactoring the subsystem. For example, some of the patches make the ->select_chip() of nand_chip a legacy hook, and removes its implementation from a number of drivers. All those patches do not bring any new feature per-se, but are part of a larger effort to clean up and modernize the MTD subsystem.
    • Boris Brezillon also contributed to the SPI NOR support a mechanism to fixup the information provided in the BFPT table of SPI NOR flashes. This is used to ensure that some Macronix SPI NOR flashes are properly recognized as supporting 4-byte opcodes.
  • Maxime Ripard contributed a number of improvements to the OV6540 camera sensor driver, especially to remove the hardcoded initialization sequence by a much more flexible initialization code, which allowed to support 60fps and more resolutions.
  • Maxime Ripard extended the PHY subsystem with two new functions, phy_configure() and phy_validate(), which allow to pass configuration details to PHY drivers. This was then used by Maxime to implement MIPI D-PHY drivers, which need a significant number of configuration parameters. See this commit and this commit for details. MIPI D-PHY are typically used in video display or capture HW pipelines.
  • As part of our work on RaspberryPi display support, Boris Brezillon contributed a number of fixs to the VC4 display controller driver.
  • For the support of Microchip MPU (Atmel) platforms, Alexandre Belloni migrated the AT91SAM9260, AT91SAM9261, AT91SAM9263, AT91SAM9RL, AT91SAM9x5, SAMA5D2 and SAMA5D4 platforms to the new clock Device Tree binding that he introduced in Linux 4.20.
  • For the support of Microchip UNG (formerly Microsemi) platforms, Alexandre Belloni added support for the Jaguar2 platform to the pinctrl driver already used for the Ocelot platform.
  • For the support of Allwinnner platforms:
    • Maxime Ripard did a huge amount of Device Tree cleanups and improvements, fixing DTC warnings, but generally making sure those Device Tree files are consistent.
    • Paul Kocialkowski implemented support for YUV planes in the Allwinner display controller driver. This allows to display a video decoded by the VPU directly into a display controller plane, and let the hardware compose it with other display planes, without CPU intervention.
    • Paul Kocialkowski enabled the VPU (for hardware-accelerated video decoding) on the Allwinner H5 and A64. This work was part of our crowdfunding campaign around the Allwinner VPU support.
  • For the support of Marvell platforms
    • Miquèl Raynal added support for suspend/resume to the SATA support on Armada 3720 (the SoC used for the popular EspressoBin platform), as part of a larger effort of bringing full suspend/resume support on Armada 3720
    • Miquèl Raynal implemented support for the thermal overheat interrupt on Armada 7K/8K.

Here is the detailed list of commits we contributed to Linux 5.0:

Raspberry Pi: update breaks Raspbian Stretch

Raspberry Pi logoToday, the three Raspberry Pis that we have on our network went down. They were all running Raspbian (Debian for Raspberry Pi) Stretch.

While this issue can be solved, it is serious enough to require to remove the micro-SD card and manually fix the the root filesystem. Therefore, it seems you cannot fix this issue unless you have physical access to your system.

Here are details to attract attention to this issue…

As I started telling you, our systems were down, well almost. Some services were still running, as they were still responding to ping through our VPN. However, SSH access was no longer available:

$ ssh scan
ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host

After connecting a serial cable to one of the Pis, and adding init=/bin/sh to the /boot/cmdline.txt file. I found that I couldn’t seem to execute at least some executables. Everything I tried to execute was causing a segmentation fault.

It was time to remove the micro-SD card and look at system logs. Inspecting /var/log/apt/history.log revealed that the raspi-copies-and-fills package was updated yesterday (March. 11, 2019). This allowed me to make a search for issue reports with this package name. Indeed, before having such a lead, I couldn’t find what I was looking for, as there are too many discussions about the use of the Raspberry Pi! So, here’s what I quickly found following this lead:

raspi-copies-and-fills package gone AWOL? (Raspberry Pi forums)
Ras3 crashes after update (Raspberry Pi forums)

These posts have all details. All you need to do is take away the micro-SD card, repair the second partition with e2fsck -f /dev/mmcblk0p2 and remove the etc/ld.so.preload file inside this partition.

Note, that at the time of this writing, this issue has already been fixed, so it is safe to upgrade your Pi if it is still up and running, or right after repairing your Raspbian root filesystem.

This incident is very unfortunate, as you need to physically access your board to recover from it. I hope you don’t run updates as frequently as we do (or right after the time when the update was issued), and that your Pis are not impacted, otherwise possibly forcing you to travel or to crawl into difficult to access places to reach your boards.

However, I don’t want blame the community volunteers running Raspbian. They have made a terrific job maintaining this distro which had been flawlessly running for more many years on our systems. This seems as good as what we get from commercial distributions.

I hope that not too many services ran by Raspberry Pis will be disrupted because of this issue. However, that may be yet another way to prove how popular such devices are.

Bootlin at the Buildroot Developers Meeting, February 2019

Buildroot logoIt’s now a tradition: the Buildroot project organizes one of its Buildroot Developers Meeting right after the FOSDEM conference. 2019 was no exception, and the meeting took place from February 4 to February 6, a three days duration, instead of the traditional two days duration from the previous years. Once again, the meeting was sponsored by Google, who provided the meeting location and lunch for all participants. Bootlin participated to the event, by allowing its engineer Thomas Petazzoni to join the meeting.

The meeting was a mix of discussions on various topics and actual hacking, with a focus on reducing the backlog of pending patches. The report synthetizes the most important discussion items:

  • A short general assembly of the Buildroot Association took place
  • Some discussions around the download infrastructure took place, related to the re-introduction of the make source-check feature and the issue of tarball reproducibility with version control system download backends
  • Discussion about introducing Config.in options for all host packages, an idea that we decided to not pursue for the moment.
  • Discussion about the instrumentation hooks that are used to collect the list of files installed by packages, and how we can achieve this goal in a way that is both efficient and reliable
  • Discussion on which Qt5 versions to support
  • Discussion on participating to the Google Summer of Code. We wrote a few topic ideas and applied as an organization for GSoC 2019.
  • Discussion on how to integrate support for systemd sysusers mechanism

Reading the work on the pending patches, we managed to reduce the backlog from about 300 patches to around 170 patches, which is a very significant achievement.

From left to right: Mark Corbin, Adam Duskett, Angelo Compagnucci (front), Peter Korsgaard (back), Thomas Petazzoni (front), Arnout Vandecappelle (back), Thomas De Schampheleire, Adrian Perez de Castro and Titouan Christophe. Behind the camera: Yann E. Morin.

More specifically, Thomas Petazzoni took advantage of this meeting to:

  • Finalize his work on the pkg-stats script, to include details about the latest available upstream version of each Buildroot package. To do so, it relies on information provided by the release-monitoring.org website. The information is not yet accurate for all packages, but the accuracy can be improved by contributing to release-monitoring.org. The updated package statistics page now provides those details, which will help ensure Buildroot packages are kept up-to-date.
  • Review in detail the patch series from Adam Duskett introducing support for GObject Introspection. It is far from a trivial package due to the need to run during the build some small binaries using Qemu. While the series is not merged yet, we have a much better understanding of it, which will help complete the review process.
  • Do a final review and apply the lengthy patch series reworking the fftw package.
  • Participate, as a Buildroot co-maintainer, to the pending patches backlog cleanup, by reviewing and/or merging a significant number of patches.

It was once again a very nice and productive meeting. The next meeting will take place as usual around the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, in October, in Lyon (France).

Free seats in embedded Linux and kernel training sessions (Mar 2019)

Student penguinsAt Bootlin, we owe a lot to the Free Software community, and we’re doing our best to give back as much as we can.

One way of doing that is welcoming community contributors in our public training sessions organized in France. We’ve done that multiple times several years back, and this allowed us to meet very interesting people (who even had very valuable experience and points of view to share with the other course participants), while of course giving them extra knowledge that they can use for further contributions.

Here are the next sessions in which we can offer a free seat:

See our Free training seats page for practical details about how to apply.

Don’t hesitate to apply to this free seat. In past editions, we didn’t have so many people applying, and therefore you have a real chance to get selected!

Follow Bootlin on Mastodon

We’ve started to use Mastodon (in addition to Twitter and LinkedIn) to share quick news with you: new blog posts, contributions to Free Software projects, photos at events, etc.

Did you know Mastodon? I’ll like Twitter, but better, decentralized and really free (as in Free Software). I discovered it by attending one of the conferences we sponsor (Capitole du Libre in Toulouse, France) and by following the efforts of Framasoft to provide decentralized Internet services.

There is a very nice article introducing Mastodon and its strengths vs Twitter: Mastodon Is Better than Twitter: Elevator Pitch.

Here is a summary of Mastodon’s advantages:

  • Being Free Software and not biased by the need to maximize revenue for its investors
  • It’s decentralized and therefore controlled by its users. You are free to join an instance that matches your interests and sensibility, but of course you can follow anyone on any other instance. It’s also easy to move to another instance or even host your own one
  • There are no Retweets but Boosts. Retweets allow to share a post with your own comments to all your followers. This creates flame wars in the best interest of Twitter. Twitter needs its users to spend as much time as possible viewing the content they host (and therefore their promoted content at the same time). Instead, Mastodon only allows to “boost” the visibility of someone else’s post, without allow you to add your own comments. Mastodon has no interest in making you stay as long as possible by creating flame wars. It just lets you focus on the content your are interested in.

In a nutshell, using Mastodon contributes to a better world in which users are in control of their data, interests and time.

What about joining the Mastodon network and give it a try ! Go to https://joinmastodon.org, choose your perfect community (your Mastodon instance… we are on https://fosstodon.org), and follow us if you wish on https://fosstodon.org/@bootlin.

We hope that you will like the experience.

Network traffic encryption in Linux using MACsec and hardware offloading

MACsec is an IEEE standard (IEEE 802.1AE) for MAC security, introduced in 2006. It defines a way to establish a protocol independent connection between two hosts with data confidentiality, authenticity and/or integrity, using GCM-AES-128. MACsec operates on the Ethernet layer and as such is a layer 2 protocol, which means it’s designed to secure traffic within a layer 2 network, including DHCP or ARP requests. It does not compete with other security solutions such as IPsec (layer 3) or TLS (layer 4), as all those solutions are used for their own specific use cases.

We have recently worked on enabling hardware offloading of MACsec operations on a Microsemi VSC8584 Ethernet PHY in Linux, by contributing support for MACsec offloading to the Linux networking stack. In this blog post, we present this work through an introduction to MACsec, details on the current state of MACsec support in Linux and finally our work to support MACsec hardware offloading.

Introduction to MACsec

MACsec uses its own frame format with its own EtherType (a 2-bytes field found in Ethernet frames to indicate what the protocol encapsulated in the payload is). As an example, when encapsulating an IPv4 frame, we would have Ethernet<MACsec<IPv4 instead of Ethernet<IPv4.

The MACsec configuration within a node is represented at the top level by Secure Channels. A secure channel is identified by its SCI (Secure Channel Identifier) and contains parameters such as the encryption, protection and replay protection booleans. A secure channel is either a transmit or a receive one: the receive secure channel configuration on a given host should match the transmit one of another host for MACsec traffic to flow successfully.

Within each secure channel, security associations are described. They are identified by an association number and define the encryption/decryption keys used and the current packet number, which is used for replay protection.

MACsec support in Linux

Linux has a software implementation of MACsec, found at drivers/net/macsec.c, which was introduced by Red Hat engineer Sabrina Dubroca in 2016 and available since Linux 4.5. The support is implemented as full virtual network devices, on per transmit secure channel, attached to a parent network device. The parent interface only sees raw packets, which are in the MACsec case raw Ethernet packets with protected or encrypted content. This design is very similar to other supported protocols in Linux such as VLANs.

MACsec support was also introduced in iproute2, a collection of utilities aiming at configuring various networking parts of the kernel (interfaces management, IP configuration, routes…). The command to use is ip macsec.

If we were to configure a secure channel between two hosts we would first need to create a virtual MACsec interface (representing a transmit secure channel) on both hosts, on top of a physical network interface. Let’s say we use eth0 on both our hosts (Alice and Bob), and we want to encrypt the MACsec traffic:

Alice # ip macsec add link eth0 macsec0 type macsec encrypt on
  Bob # ip macsec add link eth0 macsec0 type macsec encrypt on

The next step would be to configure matching receiving secure channel on both hosts:

Alice # ip macsec add macsec0 rx port 1 address <Bob's eth0 MAC>
  Bob # ip macsec add macsec0 rx port 1 address <Alice's eth0 MAC>

We would then configure the transmit channels, and for each we would need to generate a key:

Alice # hexdump -n 16 -e '4/4 "%08x" 1 "\n"' /dev/random
d29a43c8cba96a325f6b6a40a214c58c
Alice # ip macsec add macsec0 tx sa 0 pn 1 \
        on key d29a43c8cba96a325f6b6a40a214c58c

Bob # hexdump -n 16 -e '4/4 "%08x" 1 "\n"' /dev/random
a1e15a1d91222196fde87b2d75a4fac0
Bob # ip macsec add macsec0 tx sa 0 pn 1 \
      on key a1e15a1d91222196fde87b2d75a4fac0

We finally need to configure the receive channels, so that the hosts can authenticate and decrypt packets:

Alice # ip macsec add macsec0 rx port 1 \
        address <Bob's MAC> sa 0 pn 1   \
        on key 00 a1e15a1d91222196fde87b2d75a4fac0
 
  Bob # ip macsec add macsec0 rx port 1 \
        address <Alice's MAC> sa 0 pn 1 \
        on key 00 d29a43c8cba96a325f6b6a40a214c58c

Once all of the MACsec configuration is done we would be able to exchange traffic between Alice and Bob, using authenticated and encrypted packets:

Alice # ip link set macsec0 up
Alice # ip addr add 192.168.42.1/24 dev macsec0

  Bob # ip link set macsec0 up
  Bob # ip addr add 192.168.42.2/24 dev macsec0

What’s coming next: hardware offloading

There are hardware devices featuring a MACsec transformation implementation which can be used to offload the frame generation and encryption / authentication of MACsec frames (for both ingress and egress frames). The benefit of hardware offloading is to discharge the CPU from doing certain operations (in our case MACsec transformations) by doing them in a dedicated hardware engine, which may or may not provide better performance. The idea is essentially to free the CPU from being used by a single application so that the system in its whole runs better.

MACsec offloading devices aren’t currently supported in the Linux kernel and no generic infrastructure is available to delegate MACsec operation to a given hardware device. At Bootlin over the last months we worked on adding such an infrastructure and support for offloading MACsec operations to a first device.

This work was done in two steps. First we needed to extend the current MACsec implementation to propagate commands and configuration to hardware drivers. Our idea was to leverage the current MACsec software implementation to use the exact same commands described above to setup an hardware accelerated MACsec connection, when a Linux networking port supports it. This should allow to have a more maintainable implementation as well.

We then worked on implementing a MACsec specific helper in a networking PHY driver : the Microsemi VSC8584 Ethernet PHY. This PHY has a MACsec engine which can be used to match flows and to perform MACsec transformations and operations. When configured packets can be encrypted and decrypted, protected and validated, without the CPU intervention.

Conclusion

We recently sent a first version of patch series to the Linux network mailing list, which is currently being discussed. This series of patches introduces both the hardware offloading support for MACsec and the ability to offload MACsec operations to a first hardware engine. We hope support for other MACsec engines will come after!

tftp and NFS booting on Beagle Bone Black Wireless and Pocket Beagle

BeagleBoneBlack Wireless board  booting through tftp and NFS
BeagleBoneBlack Wireless board booting through tftp and NFS

Here are details about booting the Beagle Bone Black Wireless board through NFS. I’m writing this here because it doesn’t seem to be documented anywhere else (except in our Linux kernel and driver development course, for which I had to support this feature).

Why

Booting a board on a root filesystem that is a directory on your workstation (development PC) or on a server, shared through the network, is very convenient for development purposes.

For example, you can update kernel modules or programs by recompiling them on your PC, and the target board will immediately “see” the updates. There’s no need to transfer them in some way.

Doing this is quite straightforward on boards that have an Ethernet port, and well documented throughout the Internet (see our instructions). However, things get more complicated with boards that have no such port, such as the Beagle Bone Black Wireless or the Pocket Beagle.

The Beagle Bone Black Wireless board has WiFi support, but booting on NFS directly from the kernel (instead of using an initramfs) is another kind of challenge.

Something easier to use is networking over USB device (also called USB gadget as our operating system is running on the USB device side), which is supported by both Linux and U-Boot.

Note that the below instructions also work on the original Beagle Bone Black, bringing the convenience of not having to use an RJ45 cable. All you need is the USB device cable that you’re using for power supply too.

These instructions should also support the Pocket Beagle board, which is similar, though much simpler.

Preparing U-Boot

This part may just work out of the box if the U-Boot version on your board is recent and was built using the default configuration for your board.

If that’s not the case, you can reflash U-Boot on your board using our instructions.

Now, let’s configure networking in U-Boot:

  • ipaddr: IP address of the board
  • serverip: IP address of your PC or server
setenv ipaddr 192.168.0.100
setenv serverip 192.168.0.1

Make sure that this address belongs to a separate network segment from the one used by your PC to connect to the network.

We also need to configure Ethernet over USB device:

  • ethact: controls which interface is currently active.
  • usbnet_devaddr: MAC address on the device side
  • usbnet_hostaddr: MAC address on the host side
setenv ethact usb_ether
setenv usbnet_devaddr f8:dc:7a:00:00:02
setenv usbnet_hostaddr f8:dc:7a:00:00:01
saveenv

Note that the above MAC addresses are arbitrary.

Configure your PC

These instructions have been tested on Ubuntu 18.04, but they should be easy to adapt on other GNU/Linux distributions.

To configure your network interface on the workstation side, we need to know the name of the network interface connected to your board.

However, you won’t be able to see the network interface corresponding to the Ethernet over USB device connection yet, because it’s only active when the board turns it on, from U-Boot or from Linux. When this happens, the network interface name will be enx. Given the value we gave to usbnet_hostaddr, it will therefore be enxf8dc7a000001.

Then, instead of configuring the host IP address from NetWork Manager’s graphical interface, let’s do it through its command line interface, which is so much easier to use:

nmcli con add type ethernet ifname enxf8dc7a000001 ip4 192.168.0.1/24

To download the kernel and device tree blob which are also on your PC, let’s install a TFTP server on it:

sudo apt install tftpd-hpa

You can then test the TFTP connection, which is also a way to test that USB networking works. First, put a small text file in /var/lib/tftpboot.

Then, from U-Boot, do:

tftp 0x81000000 textfile.txt

The tftp command should have downloaded the textfile.txt file from your development workstation into the board’s RAM at location 0x81000000. You can verify that the download was successful by dumping the contents of memory:

md 0x81000000

We are now ready to load and boot a Linux kernel!

Kernel configuration

These instructions were tested with Linux 4.19

Configuring and cross-compiling the Linux kernel for the board is outside the scope of this article, but again, such information is easy to find (such as in our training slides).

Here, we’re just sharing the Linux kernel configuration settings that are needed for networking over USB device. Since they are not supported by the default configuration file for the omap2plus CPU family (for several reasons that were discussed on the Linux kernel mainling list), it took a bit of time to figure out which ones were needed. Here they are:

Add the below options to support networking over USB device:

  • CONFIG_USB_GADGET=y
  • CONFIG_USB_MUSB_HDRC=y: Driver for the USB OTG controller
  • CONFIG_USB_MUSB_GADGET=y: Use the USB OTG controller in device (gadget) mode
  • CONFIG_USB_MUSB_DSPS=y
  • Check the dependencies of CONFIG_AM335X_PHY_USB. You need to set CONFIG_NOP_USB_XCEIV=y to be able to set CONFIG_AM335X_PHY_USB=y
  • Find the ”USB Gadget precomposed configurations” menu and set it to static instead of module so that CONFIG_USB_ETH=y

How did I found out which settings were needed? I had to check the device tree to find the USB device controller. Then, using git grep, I found the driver that was supporting the corresponding compatible string. Then, looking at the Makefile in the driver directory, I found which kernel configuration settings were needed.

When compiling is over, copy the zImage and am335x-boneblack-wireless.dtb files to the TFTP server home directory (/var/lib/tftpboot).

You also need an NFS server on your workstation:

sudo apt install nfs-kernel-server

Then edit the /etc/exports file as root to add the following line, assuming that the IP address of your board will be 192.168.0.100:

/home/user/nfsroot 192.168.0.100(rw,no_root_squash,no_subtree_check)

(If you don’t have a root filesystem yet, you can use the one in our lab data archive.)

Then, restart the NFS server:

sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server restart

Configuring the kernel command line

Back to the U-Boot command line, configure the kernel command line by setting the bootargs environment variable (all in just one line):

setenv bootargs root=/dev/nfs rw ip=192.168.0.100:::::usb0 console=ttyO0,115200n8 g_ether.dev_addr=f8:dc:7a:00:00:02 g_ether.host_addr=f8:dc:7a:00:00:01 nfsroot=192.168.0.1:/home/user/nfsroot,nfsvers=3

Also set the series of commands to run at boot time:

setenv bootcmd 'tftp 0x81000000 zImage; tftp 0x82000000 am335x-boneblack-wireless.dtb; bootz 0x81000000 - 0x82000000'
saveenv

You are ready to boot:

boot

Now check the kernel log and make sure an IP address is correctly assigned to your board by Linux. If NFS booting doesn’t work yet, that could be because of NFS server or client issues. If that’s the case, you should find details in the NFS server logs in /var/log/syslog on your PC.

2018 at Bootlin, a year in review

First of all, the entire team at Bootlin wishes you a Happy New Year, and best wishes for 2019 in your personal and professional life. The beginning of the new year is a good time to look back and see the achievements of the past year, which is why we review the 2018 year in terms of Bootlin news and activity:

We’re now called Bootlin

Due to a legal battle related to trademarks, we decided to change our name to Bootlin at the beginning of 2018. The company was not sold or purchased, it is still owned by the same people, and driven by the same team of engineers. This change of name obviously took a lot of time, which could have been used for other more productive contribution activities, but it’s finally done, and in 2019 we can move on and leave this legal battle behind us. See our blog post for more details.

Kernel contributions

In 2018, we contributed to the 4.15, 4.16, 4.17, 4.18, 4.19 and 4.20 kernel releases a total of 1365 commits, putting Bootlin regularly in the top 20 companies contributing to the Linux kernel.

Our most significant contributions have been:

  • Thanks to a successful crowdfunding campaign launched in February, we have been able to dedicate enough time to develop and upstream a Linux kernel driver and associated user-space library to support hardware-accelerated video decoding on Allwinner processors. This was a massive effort as it required discussing with the Linux kernel community a new set of userspace interfaces to support stateless video decoders. The base of our driver was merged in Linux 4.20 and supports only MPEG2 decoding. Support for H264 and H265 decoding is ready and has been posted several times, but discussions on the userspace interface are still on-going. See our numerous blog posts and especially the end of year status.
  • We have developed and contributed a brand new Linux kernel subsystem to support the MIPI I3C bus, a modern bus offering an alternative to SPI or I2C. Being vastly different from I2C, it required a completely separate subsystem located in drivers/i3c/. Along with the core subsystem itself, we developed a driver for the Cadence I3C master, and a driver for a Cadence I3C GPIO expander. See our blog posts on I3C for more details.
  • We contributed a new interface called exec_op for NAND flash controller drivers, which allows the MTD subsystem to more easily support optimized NAND flash controllers and vendor-specific NAND commands. This new interface was originally developed for the Marvell NAND controller driver, but a number of other drivers have been converted since then, and all new drivers make use of his interface. See our blog post for more details.
  • We contributed support for the Microsemi VSC7513 and VSC7514 MIPS processors, with the base support (irqchip, pinctrl, gpio, reset, DT) but more importantly a massive switchdev driver to support the major feature of these processors: a built-in gigabit Ethernet switch. Our switchdev driver supports bridging, STP, IGMP snooping, VLAN filtering and link aggregation. See our blog posts about platform support and switchdev support.
  • We contributed a new subsystem called spi-mem, which allows to support SPI flash memories in a generic way, re-using SPI controller drivers for regular SPI devices, SPI NOR flashes and SPI NAND flashes, instead of having separate controller drivers as was done until now for SPI NOR support. On top of spi-mem, we added support for SPI NAND flash memories to Linux. See our blog post on spi-mem: bringing some consistency to the SPI memory ecosystem.
  • We contributed a number of drivers for Cadence hardware IPs: Cadence MIPI CSI receiver, Cadence MIPI CSI transceiver, Cadence DSI encoder, Cadence PCIe host controller, Cadence PCIe endpoint controller and as detailed above Cadence I3C master controller.
  • We continued to work on improving the support for Marvell ARM processors
    • Improvements in the inside-secure crypto accelerator driver: support for new crypto algorithms, support for the EIP97 variant which enabled using the driver on Armada 37xx in addition to the already support EIP197 variant used on Armada 7K/8K, numerous fixes and performance improvements
    • Improvements in the mvpp2 network controller driver, used on Armada 7K/8K: RSS support, support for SFP ports, HW offloading for VLAN filtering, 1000baseX and 2500baseX support
    • On Armada 7K/8K, we added support for the NAND controller and the thermal sensors.
    • On Armada 37xx, we added cpufreq support and the first pieces of suspend/resume support.
  • Allwinner platform support improvements: of course the Allwinner VPU driver detailed above, but also general improvements to the Allwinner A83 support (for which we delivered a complete BSP for a customer), improvements to the sun4i display driver (especially support for YUV planes, and MIPI DSI support on Allwinner A33), improvements to the sun8i-codec audio driver, and improvements to the AXP209 and AXP813 PMIC drivers.
  • For Microchip/Atmel platforms, we continued our maintenance work, with a focus this year on reworking the representation of the platform clocks in the Device Tree.

U-Boot contributions

Even if Bootlin is mainly active as a Linux kernel contributor, we also contribute to U-Boot, and we have been more active in 2018 than we were in the past. In a recent blog post, we summarized our most significant contributions:

  • Support for SPI NAND memories, as well as a significant sync of the MTD stack in U-Boot with the one from Linux, and the introduction of a generic mtd U-Boot command to manipulate all types of flash memories
  • Generic support for TPMv2 and for TPMv2 chips connected over SPI
  • Brand new subsystem to support 1-wire controllers and devices
  • Support for the Microsemi Ocelot and Luton MIPS processors. We also contributed support for Microsemi Ocelot to Linux, as discussed above
  • Support for the ARM PL022 SPI controller
  • Support for multiple U-Boot environment backends
  • Support for Microsemi VSC8574 and VSC8584 Ethernet PHYs

In total, we contributed 172 commits to U-Boot in 2018.

Other contributions

Beyond Linux and U-Boot, we also contributed to a few other open-source projects:

Other engineering projects

While many of our engineering projects are directly related to upstream contributions, which have been described above, some are not always leading to direct contributions. Here is a small selection of other interesting projects we worked on in 2018:

  • For a German customer in the healthcare industry, wrote a complete U-Boot, Linux and Buildroot BSP for a custom NXP i.MX6 platform.
  • For an international company in the TV/set-top box industry, worked on adding support for top-level parallel build to Buildroot.
  • For a Netherlands based customer in the gaming industry, wrote a complete U-Boot, Linux and Buildrot BSP for a custom Allwinner A33 platform, with significant boot time optimization to quickly boot up to a Qt5 OpenGL application.
  • For a Spanish customer, brought up a PCM1789 audio codec connected to a NXP i.MX6 processor, and for an Italian customer, brought up a CS4272 audio codec connected to an Allwinner A20 processor. Under Linux, of course!
  • We continued working for a major US customer, delivering an i.MX6 and SPEAr600 Linux BSP based on Yocto. Our work in 2018 was mainly focused on supporting secure boot on i.MX6 (see our talk at ELC on this topic) and porting a modern version of U-Boot on the SPEAr600 platform.
  • For a customer in Chile, we worked on supporting a OV5640 camera sensor connected over CSI to an Allwinner H3 platform. Thanks to this, we made a significant number of improvements to the OV5640 driver.
  • We have continued to maintain toolchains.bootlin.com, by keeping the toolchains reguarly updated, and adding support for the RISC-V 64 bit architecture. See our blog posts.

Conferences

In 2018, Bootlin was at a large number of conferences and events:

Training

In 2018, we gave our Embedded Linux, Linux kernel, Yocto Project and Buildroot training courses on-site in the United States, Portugal, Belgium, Germany, France, Spain, Serbia, Greece, Bosnia, Finland and Switzerland. As you can see, we travel all around the world to teach our training courses.

Of course, we continued our public training sessions organized in Avignon (France), given in English by Bootlin founder and CEO Michael Opdenacker.

In 2018, we made 217 commits to our training materials Git repository, showing our continuous work to keep them updated. Our training materials remain all freely available under a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license, as they have been since Bootlin creation fifteen years ago.

Office expansion

In 2018, we expanded both our Toulouse and Lyon offices:

  • We moved our office in Toulouse mid-2018 from a 100m² surface to a 180m² one, offering more room for the existing team, and room to expand the team in the coming years. As of January 1, 2019, we have a team of 8 engineers working in Toulouse.
  • We moved our office in Lyon end of 2018 from a small one room office of 30m² to a full office of 100m², here as well to expand the team in the coming years. As of January 1, 2019, the team in Lyon has 2 engineers, but we hope to increase this number soon (see Recruiting below).

Recruiting

In terms of recruiting:

  • Maxime Chevallier joined us in February 2018, and has since then been mostly working on networking topics on Marvell platforms, but also a few other engineering projects.
  • Paul Kocialkowski joined us in March 2018 for an internship focused on the Allwinner VPU development and then was hired as a full-time engineer starting November 2018.
  • Thanks to our office expansion in Lyon, we have an open position for a Embedded Linux and Kernel engineer with existing experience in Lyon. See our blog post (in French) for more details.
  • We have openings for several internships in 2019, on Linux, U-Boot, Buildroot and Elixir related topics. See our blog post (in French).

Financial support

In 2018, we continued to support organizations and events who promote and defend Free Software:

  • Donating 1,024 EUR to Framasoft, an organization whose goal (in addition to supporting Free Software) is to decentralize Internet services. For example, they made a huge effort to release PeerTube in 2018, a peer-to-peer and of course Free Software alternative to centralized video hosting solutions.
  • Donating 1,024 EUR to Wikimedia France, to support free knowledge sharing through projects such as Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons.
  • Donating 1,024 EUR to April, a French organization doing terrific work to promote Free Software, to follow the evolution of national and European law, and to animate campaigns to keep our political representatives aware of the needs of Free Software developers and users.
  • We also sponsored the Capitole du Libre 2018 (250 EUR) and Buildroot Developers Meeting 2018 in Edinburgh (250 EUR) events.
  • And of course, we support the LWN.net on-line weekly column through a corporate subscription (810 USD).
  • Last words

    We have plenty of ideas for 2019, so stay tuned for more news. We hope that 2019 will be a great year for you too, with many contributions of all kinds to the lives of others.

    A year of Bootlin contributions to U-Boot

    We regularly post about Bootlin contributions to the Linux kernel, but we more rarely post about our U-Boot contributions. Even though we are a bit less active in U-Boot than we are in Linux, we do quite a bit of upstream U-Boot work as well. In this blog post, we do a review of our most significant U-Boot contributions in 2018.

    U-Boot 2018.03

    Maxime Ripard contributed support for using multiple U-Boot environments. Thanks to this, multiple U-Boot environment backends can be compiled into a single U-Boot binary, so that it can support falling back to a different environment backend if needed. For example, U-Boot can try to load an environment from a file in a FAT partition, and if that fails, try to load from raw MMC storage. As explained by Maxime Ripard in his cover letter, this is useful to help converting Allwinner-based platforms from an environment stored in raw MMC to an environment stored in a FAT partition.

    U-Boot 2018.05

    Miquèl Raynal contributed support for the Allwinner A33 based Nintendo NES Classic platform. It was also the first Allwinner A33 platform supported in U-Boot that boots from NAND, so as part of this work, Miquèl had to change the Allwinner NAND driver used in the SPL to make it work on Allwinner A31, which required using PIO transfers instead of DMA, and a number of other changes.

    U-Boot 2018.07

    Miquèl Raynal contributed generic support for TPMv2, and also specifically support for TPMv2 chips over SPI. We will publish a more detailed blog post about this topic in the near future.

    U-Boot 2018.09

    Quentin Schulz improved the env import command so that it can filter the environment variables it loads from the provided environment. This allows to white-list only a few selected environment variables in cases where the system is locked down by secure boot, but we still need a small writable U-Boot environment to store a few variables. As part of this release, Miquèl Raynal also contributed a few TPM-related fixes.

    U-Boot 2018.11

    • Miquèl Raynal contributed a lot of changes in the MTD subsystem, which brought support for SPI NAND flash memories in U-Boot. We described this work in a previous blog post. Boris Brezillon helped by submitting a number of fixes related to this effort.
    • Miquèl Raynal contributed a new mtd command, which can be used in a generic way to access all flash memories. This command will replace commands such as sf, nand, etc. We will publish in the near future a separate blog post about this topic.
    • Quentin Schulz contributed a SPI controller driver for the ARM PL022 SPI controller, which we are using on an old STMicro SPEAr600 platform.
    • Maxime Ripard contributed a brand new subsystem to support One Wire devices. This work was initially started by Maxime years ago as part of our work on the CHIP platform from Nextthing, and was picked up by Eugen Hristev from Microchip who pushed it all the way to upstream U-Boot.

    U-Boot 2019.01

    • Grégory Clement contributed the support for the Microchip/Microsemi Ocelot and Luton MIPS platforms, which includes the core code, but also a GPIO driver and a pinctrl driver.
    • Boris Brezillon contributed a number of fixes in the MTD subsystem to address various issues introduced by our work on this subsystem in the previous release.
    • Quentin Schulz contributed support for the VSC8574 and VSC8584 Ethernet PHYs from Microchip/Microsemi.
    • Miquèl Raynal improved the NAND controller driver for Marvell platforms by adding raw read support, which was used to add support for NAND chips using 2 KB pages and a ECC strength of 8 bits.

    Overall contribution statistics

    Overall, during this year, Bootlin engineer Miquèl Raynal contributed 90 commits, Maxime Ripard 33 commits, Boris Brezillon 24 commits, Quentin Schulz 14 commits, Grégory Clement 9 commits and Mylène Josserand 2 commits, a total of 172 commits, including some significant new features: SPI NAND support, TPMv2 support, One Wire subsystem, Ocelot and Luton platform support, ARM PL022 SPI controller support, support for additional Ethernet PHY, support for multiple environments.

    We expect to continue our involvement in upstream U-Boot development, starting with a new network driver for the Microchip/Microsemi Ocelot and Luton platforms.

    Detailed list of our contributions