Seminar “Porting Linux on an ARM board”, materials available

Porting Linux on an ARM boardOn December 10th 2015, Bootlin engineer Alexandre Belloni gave a half-day seminar on the topic of Porting Linux on an ARM board in Toulouse, France. This seminar covers topics like porting the bootloader, understanding the concept of the Device Tree, writing Linux device drivers and more. With ~50 persons from various companies attending and lots of questions from the audience, this first edition has been very successful, which shows an increasing interest for using Linux on ARM platforms in the industry.

We are now publishing the 220 slides materials from this seminar, available in PDF format. Like all our training materials, this material is published under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license, which allows everyone to re-use it for free, provided the derivative works are released under the same license. We indeed re-used quite extensively parts of our existing training materials for this half-day seminar.

We plan to give this half-day seminar in other locations in France in 2016. Contact us if you are interested in organizing a similar seminar in your area (we are happy to travel!).

Linux device drivers architecture talk at Libre Software Meeting

recursive device modelThomas Petazzoni gave a talk on the Linux kernel architecture for device drivers at the Libre Software Meeting in Bordeaux, France. While the talk was given in French, the materials are in English and can therefore benefit a larger audience. The talk seems to have been well-received, especially from people already having a basic Linux kernel development experience. The topics covered are part of our Linux Kernel development training, and are also usually very appreciated from the trainees already having Linux kernel experience.

The idea of the talk is to give an overview of how device drivers fit into the kernel, both to expose their functionality to upper layers (such as a network device driver exposes itself to the kernel network infrastructure) and to detect/access the hardware using the device/driver model, which is quite hard to understand from the source code only.

The talk went through the following sections :

  • First a basic introduction to device drivers: how devices are seen from userspace applications, and how a simple, raw, character driver can be implemented. It allowed to expose the principle of operations and their similarity with methods in object-oriented programming, and the principle of registration to an upper-layer infrastructure
  • Then, an introduction to what I call « kernel frameworks », i.e kernel subsystems that specialize a general device type (i.e character device) into a particular device type (i.e serial port device, framebuffer device, etc.). The talk illustrates this with the framebuffer core and the serial port core.
  • Finally, an explanation about the device model: bus drivers, adapter drivers and device drivers. I started with the example of the USB bus: being a dynamically-enumerated bus, it provides a good illustration of the device model principles. At the end, I explained how the device model works for the devices embedded into a SoC using the platform drivers/devices mechanism

Here are the slides of this talk.