Wrapping up the Allwinner VPU crowdfunded Linux driver work

Back in early 2018, Bootlin started a crowd-funding campaign to fund the development of an upstream Linux kernel driver for the VPU found in Allwinner processors. Thanks to the support from over 400 contributors, companies and individuals, we have been able to bring support for hardware-accelerated video decoding in the mainline Linux kernel for Allwinner platforms.

From April 2018 to end of 2019, Paul Kocialkowski and Maxime Ripard at Bootlin worked hard on developing the driver and getting it accepted upstream, as well as developing the corresponding user-space components. We regularly published the progress of our work on this blog.

As of the end of 2019, we can say that all the goals defined in the Kickstarter have been completed:

  • We have an upstream Linux kernel for the Allwinner VPU, in drivers/staging/media/sunxi/cedrus, which supports MPEG2 decoding (since Linux 4.19), H264 decoding (since Linux 5.2) and H265 decoding (will be in the upcoming Linux 5.5)
  • We have a user-space VA-API implementation called libva-v4l2-request, and which allows to use any Linux kernel video codec based on the request API.
  • We have enabled the Linux kernel driver on all platforms we listed in our Kickstarter campaign: A13/A10S/A20/A33/H3 (since Linux 4.19), A64/H5 (since Linux 4.20), A10 (since Linux 5.0) and H6 (since Linux 5.1, contributed by Jernej Skrabec)

This means that the effort that was funded by the Kickstarter campaign is now over, and from now on, we are operating in maintenance mode regarding the cedrus driver: we are currently not actively working on developing new features for the driver anymore.

The Cedrus Linux driver in action

Of course, there are plenty of additional features that can be added to the driver: support for H264 encoding, support for high-profile H264 decoding, support for other video codecs. Bootlin is obviously available to develop those additional features for customers, do not hesitate to contact us if you are interested.

Overall, we found this experience of funding upstream Linux kernel development through crowd-funding very interesting and we’re happy to have been successful at delivering what was promised in our campaign. Looking at the bigger picture, the Linux userspace API for video decoding with stateless hardware codecs in V4L2 has been maturing for a while and is getting closer and closer to being finalized and declared a stable kernel API: this project has been key in the introduction of this API, as cedrus was the first driver merged to require and use it. Additional drivers are appearing for other stateless decoding engines, such as the Hantro G1 (found in Rockchip, i.MX and Microchip platforms) or the rkvdec engine. We are of course also interested in working on support for these VPUs, as we have gained significant familiarity with all things related to hardware video decoding during the cedrus adventure.

Allwinner VPU campaign one-year anniversary

Crowdfunding Campaign

It has been over a year since we launched a crowdfunding campaign to fund the development of an upstream Linux kernel driver and userspace support for the Allwinner VPU. The funding campaign was a frank success, with over 400 backers contributing a total of over 30 k€ out of the 17,6 k€ set as the initial goal. This enabled us to work on additional stretch goals, namely support for new Allwinner SoCs and H.265 decoding support.

Initial Development

Work on the Allwinner VPU started back in March 2018, being the main topic of my 6-month internship at our office in Toulouse. Bootlin engineer and long-time Allwinner Linux kernel maintainer Maxime Ripard rapidly joined the effort hands-on, to bring up support for H.264 decoding. Aspects covered by our effort include the kernel driver (cedrus), VAAPI userspace library (libva-v4l2-request) as well as testing tools (v4l2-request-test, libva-dump) and various upstream projects such as VLC and GStreamer.

We worked hard to deliver the campaign’s goals and submitted numerous revisions of the base cedrus driver along the way. By July, we announced the delivery of the campaign’s main goals (although some goals were not fully met, as explained in the associated blog post) and accompanied it with a release (tagged release-2018-07 in our git repositories).

By the end of August, we had added support for MPEG-2, H.264 and H.265 for first-generation Allwinner SoCs (and the H3 in addition), including support for accelerated display of decoded frames in the DRM driver. See our detailed blog post presenting the status at that point. Still, our changes had yet to be included in the Linux kernel.

End of the Year Status

We kept working intermittently on VPU support over the following months and manged to get the Cedrus driver accepted in Linux at the same time as the media request API. We also continued to work on submitting new versions of the series adding H.264 and H.265 support to our driver. Last but not least, we worked on adding support for the H5, A64 and A10 platforms, which were missing from the initial delivery. A dedicated blog post presents the status at the end of 2018.

Recent Developments

In 2019, Bootlin has been continuing the effort to maintain the driver and get the remaining patch series integrated in the mainline Linux kernel. We managed to get the remaining patches for DRM support merged and they will be included in Linux 5.1!

Regarding codecs support, there are still discussions happening around the H.264 and H.265 series which are now at their sixth and third revisions respectively. We are hoping that the situation will settle and that these series will be merged (in staging) as soon as possible.

March 2019 Release

With modifications taking place in the (unstable) kernel interface and userspace being updated accordingly, it became quite hard for users to properly pick the kernel and userspace components that work together. Because of that, we decided to make a new release (tagged release-2019-03 in our git repositories). It packs an updated kernel tree (based on the next media tree with our ongoing patch series applied atop) and matching versions of libva-v4l2-request and v4l2-request-test.

External Contributions

We received a few contributions along the way, such as support for the H6 SoC in the cedrus driver (that should make it to Linux 5.2) and a few minor fixes for the driver. We also received and reviewed improvement to our v4l2-request-test testing tool.

Allwinner VPU support in mainline Linux end of the year status update

The end of 2018 is approaching, which is the right time to provide an update on where we stand with the Allwinner VPU support in Linux. The promise of our Kickstarter campaign was to deliver all funded stretch goals by the end of 2018. As we’ll explain below, all the goals have been met, and only the upstreaming process is not completely finished for some features.

With the Linux 4.20 release happening just a few days ago, the core of the Cedrus driver and the media Requests API that supports it are finally available through Linus Torvalds’ tree! They provide the required interface for hardware-accelerated MPEG-2 decoding on the A13, A20, A33 and H3 Allwinner SoCs.

Cedrus driver in staging

Discussions regarding the details of the stateless video decoding interface offered by the V4L2 API are still taking place, which explains why our driver was integrated as a staging media driver. It was also decided to hide the associated interface for MPEG-2 decoding from the public kernel headers for now. This way, the interface is not considered stable and can keep evolving as discussions are still taking place. Because the kernel has a policy of never breaking backward compatibility, these interfaces will hardly evolve once they are declared stable, so it is crucial to ensure they are ready when that happens. This is especially true given the level of complexity associated with video decoding and the various pitfalls paving that road.

Status of H264 and H265 decoding support

The code for H264 and H265 decoding is already developed and functional, has already been submitted for upstream inclusion but it hasn’t been merged yet. However, with the decoding interfaces considered unstable for now, it should become easier to bring-in H.264 and H.265 decoding support to mainline. Support for these two codecs in the API and our driver is still under review and we will continue sending new iterations for them, with the suggested changes and fixes as well as adaptations for the still-evolving decoding interface. More specifically, our series need to be updated to the latest proposal for identifying reference frames, which is now based on the timestamps of the buffers.

Platform support: H5, A64 and A10 on the horizon

Regarding the platforms supported by our driver, the patches for H5 and A64 support were accepted since our last update and they will make it to Linux 4.21! We are also looking to send out support for the A10, which was missing from our previous series (but shouldn’t cause any particular trouble).

DRM driver improvements

The adaptations for the DRM driver allowing to display the raw decoded frames from the VPU on older platforms were also finalized, with the first half of the series already queued for 4.21. Subsequent changes in the series are still waiting for more reviews as they affect common parts of the framework.

Conclusion

Overall, we are slowly closing down on this project and hoping to get the remaining pieces of our work integrated in mainline Linux as soon as possible, as there seems to be very few obstacles left in the way.

Allwinner VPU support in mainline Linux November status update

Since our previous update back in September, we continued the work to reach the goals set by our crowdfunding campaign and made a number of steps forward. First, we are happy to announce that the core of the Cedrus driver was approved by the linux-media maintainers! It followed the final version of the media request API (the required piece of media framework plumbing necessary for our driver).

Both the API and our driver were merged in time for Linux 4.20, that is currently at the release candidate stage and will be released in a few weeks. The core of the Cedrus driver that is now in Linus’ tree supports hardware-accelerated video decoding for the MPEG-2 codec. We have even already seen contributions from the community, including minor fixes and improvements!

We have also been following-up on the other features covered by our crowdfunding campaign and made good progress on bringing them forward:

  • The series bringing H.264 decoding to our driver was updated for a second revision on November 15, rebased atop the upcoming Linux release and including a number of fixes as well as documentation;
  • H.265 decoding support followed with a second version sent on November 23, based on the updated H.264 series and bringing various minor improvements over the first iteration;
  • The patch series for the display engine DRM driver that adds support for the tiled YUV format used by the VPU was also updated, significantly reworked and submitted again on November 23;
  • Finally, we submitted a patch series adding support for the A64 and H5 Allwinner SoCs in the Cedrus VPU driver on November 15.
A64 and H5 boards provided by our sponsors Olimex and Libretech, now supported in Cedrus

With these patch series well on their way, we are closer than ever to delivering the remaining goals of the crowdfunding campaign!

Allwinner VPU support in mainline Linux status update (week 37)

Even though the bulk of the development on the Allwinner VPU support is done, we are still working on completing the upstreaming of the kernel driver, and some progress has been made recently on this topic:

  • On September 10, core Video4Linux developer Hans Verkuil sent a pull request to Video4Linux maintainer Mauro Carvalho Chehab to get the Cedrus driver merged. This means we’re getting closer and closer to have the driver merged. Unfortunately, some last minute issues were found in the patch series, so this pull request wasn’t merged.
  • On September 13, Bootlin engineer Maxime Ripard sent a new iteration of the Cedrus driver, version 10, which addresses those issues.
  • In addition, as the Allwinner platform maintainer, Maxime Ripard has merged the patches adding the Device Tree description of the Allwinner VPU, which reduces the Cedrus patch series to just 5 patches. They are now in the branch sunxi/dt-for-4.20, which should be part of the upcoming 4.20 Linux release.
T-Shirt for Allwinner VPU campaign supporters
T-Shirt for Allwinner VPU campaign supporters

In addition to this progress on the Linux kernel driver upstreaming process, we also moved forward with delivering the perks to the companies and individuals who supported our campaign:

  • A CREDITS file has been added to the libva-v4l2-request base, thanking all our backers who pleged more than 16 EUR.
  • The T-Shirts for the backers who pledged more than 128 EUR have been sent to those in the EU. We are also working on sending the t-shirts to those outside the EU, but it takes a bit more time due to the need for customs declarations. Don’t hesitate to take a picture of you with the T-Shirt, and post it on Twitter with the hashtag #VPULinuxDriverSupporter.