Bootlin at the ALPSS 2018 conference

The second edition of the Alpine Linux Persistent Storage Summit (ALPSS) happened two weeks ago in the Lizumerhütte Alpine lodge. Close to Innsbruck, Austria, the lodge resides in an amazingly beautiful valley. Completely separated from the rest of the world in Winter, this year edition was marked by the absence of data network access, intensifying the feeling of isolation, stimulating the exchanges between attendees. To strengthen the representation of MTD developers at this event, Bootlin sent two of his engineers: Boris Brezillon and Miquèl Raynal, respectively MTD and NAND maintainers in the Linux kernel.

Cow with a beautiful view over the Alps
Picture taken while climbing to the lodge. Author: Hans Holmberg, 2018 (CC-BY-SA)

NVMe, open-channel and zoned namespaces

While almost all the ~30 attendees work on storage support that are based on NAND flashes, a majority work on domains targeting high-performances, where power-cuts are not the issue but the latency and throughput are. Far beyond our embedded world, people are working hard on the parallelization and the standardization of high-speed interfaces (SCSI, NVMe). In the end, we all have to make the software deals with the NAND-specific constraints of the underlying storage device.

Disclaimer: This is a short summary (not exhaustive) of the “high-performance” world talks as we could understand them. This is probably not 100% accurate as the topics discussed are, currently, out of our domain of expertise. Corrections are welcome.

Matias Bjørling (Western Digital) and Christoph Hellwig presented new NVMe commands to manage NVMe zones. While zones need write order to be preserved, the Linux multi-queue block I/O queueing mechanism (blk-mq) cannot enforce this. Bart van Assche (Google) and Damien Le Moal (Western Digital) proposed a draft to reorder writes at the blk-mq layer. While this solution was not very well received, it opened the discussion on how the issue should be addressed. Bart van Assche also presented his work on copy offload mechanism in Linux, which could for instance serve to fast copy entire zones. His work could be also useful to Stephen Bates who works on PCIe peer-to-peer and talked on how he wants to eg. enable DMA between SSDs. Still on the topic of DMA and performances, Idan Burstein (Mellanox) exposed the cutting-edge features he worked on to improve Remote DMA (RDMA) performances.

MTD was also present to the party

Probably the easier part to understand for us, embedded people.

Boris and Miquèl presenting
Boris and Miquèl presenting about memories. Author: Brian Pawlowski, 2018 (CC-BY)

Boris Brezillon and Miquèl Raynal gave a talk on their recent work support for SPI memories in Linux (and U-Boot, but this will be more detailed at ELCE in October). Boris wrote a new SPI-NAND layer, converting MTD requests into SPI exchanges, giving the flow of commands to the (also brand new) SPI-mem layer to standardize how to speak with SPI controller drivers from both SPI-NAND and SPI-NOR stacks. Cleaning work is still needed on the SPI-NOR side as well as the addition of new features like direct mapping, XIP (that was discussed after the talk), the addition of support for more chips and the conversion to SPI-mem of more SPI controllers. The slides are available online, see also our previous blog post on this topic.



Richard Weinberger (from Sigma Star GmbH, and co-maintainer of MTD and UBI/UBIFS) updated us about the level of power-cut testing available to challenge the MTD stack. Tracing is possible to get closer to the failing sequence but one big problem is to replay the sequence and reproduce the issue. Tracking down untested code path is very important to keep UBI/UBIFS as reliable as possible: this is what is generally the most important when using SPI/parallel NAND devices.

Richard’s co-worker David Gstir also works on UBI/UBIFS, but on the authentication side. Bringing filesystem authentication to UBIFS could have been simple but during his introduction he disqualified most of the alternatives he had (dm-verity, fs-verity, …). Fun-fact about fs-verity, authentication would have work on the file’s contents, but not on the inodes themselves. Hence, the file’s content could not be changed, but the file itself could still be moved. So, a brand new solution has been implemented for UBIFS, upstreaming ongoing.

Original ideas presented

Benchmarking real hardware was somehow not adapted to Damien Le Moal experiments. He hacked QEMU to add the possibility to tune CPU latency so that he could compare easily the latency on in-memory data processing paths. WIP.

Johannes Thumshirn (SUSE Labs), as a side project, started reversing APFS, Apple’s new filesystem. The firm promised two years ago to release the implementation of its filesystem so that computers running Microsoft or Linux could mount it. So far nothing happened, that is why, without even a Mac in hand, he started spending nights hex-dumping structures from a filesystem image he got, reverse-engineering the content with the help of research papers already produced. The first results are there, he can now ls and cat random files!

And after talks and hiking: time to BOFs

View from the lodge of a lake and the mountains
View from the lodge. Author: Brian Pawlowski, 2018 (CC-BY)

A bit before the official BOFs time MTD folks gathered around Hans Holmberg (CNEX Labs) to carefully listen about how pblk works, a “Physical block device” FTL for SSDs supporting open-channel that could give ideas to some of them. Why not an entirely open-source SSD running Linux with its own FTL?

Finally, between all the interesting discussions that happened, we could mention the need for a generic NVMe-oF (NVMe over Fabric) discovery protocol raised by Hannes Reinecke (SUSE Labs), and the possible evolution of the MTD stack to integrate an I/O scheduler to provide much better (and parallelized) performances exposed by Boris Brezillon.

Conclusion

All attendees agreed this format of conference is really pleasant, the surrounding helping a lot to the general wellness and the success of this year’s edition of the ALPSS. We will definitely try to make it next year!

Linux 4.9 released, Bootlin contributions

Linus Torvalds has released the 4.9 Linux kernel yesterday, as was expected. With 16214 non-merge commits, this is by far the busiest kernel development cycle ever, but in large part due to the merging of thousands of commits to add support for Greybus. LWN has very well summarized what’s new in this kernel release: 4.9 Merge window part 1, 4.9 Merge window part 2, The end of the 4.9 merge window.

As usual, we take this opportunity to look at the contributions Bootlin made to this kernel release. In total, we contributed 116 non-merge commits. Our most significant contributions this time have been:

  • Bootlin engineer Boris Brezillon, already a maintainer of the Linux kernel NAND subsystem, becomes a co-maintainer of the overall MTD subsystem.
  • Contribution of an input ADC resistor ladder driver, written by Alexandre Belloni. As explained in the commit log: common way of multiplexing buttons on a single input in cheap devices is to use a resistor ladder on an ADC. This driver supports that configuration by polling an ADC channel provided by IIO.
  • On Atmel platforms, improvements to clock handling, bug fix in the Atmel HLCDC display controller driver.
  • On Marvell EBU platforms
    • Addition of clock drivers for the Marvell Armada 3700 (Cortex-A53 based), by Grégory Clement
    • Several bug fixes and improvements to the Marvell CESA driver, for the crypto engine founds in most Marvell EBU processors. By Romain Perier and Thomas Petazzoni
    • Support for the PIC interrupt controller, used on the Marvell Armada 7K/8K SoCs, currently used for the PMU (Performance Monitoring Unit). By Thomas Petazzoni.
    • Enabling of Armada 8K devices, with support for the slave CP110 and the first Armada 8040 development board. By Thomas Petazzoni.
  • On Allwinner platforms
    • Addition of GPIO support to the AXP209 driver, which is used to control the PMIC used on most Allwinner designs. Done by Maxime Ripard.
    • Initial support for the Nextthing GR8 SoC. By Mylène Josserand and Maxime Ripard (pinctrl driver and Device Tree)
    • The improved sunxi-ng clock code, introduced in Linux 4.8, is now used for Allwinner A23 and A33. Done by Maxime Ripard.
    • Add support for the Allwinner A33 display controller, by re-using and extending the existing sun4i DRM/KMS driver. Done by Maxime Ripard.
    • Addition of bridge support in the sun4i DRM/KMS driver, as well as the code for a RGB to VGA bridge, used by the C.H.I.P VGA expansion board. By Maxime Ripard.
  • Numerous cleanups and improvements commits in the UBI subsystem, in preparation for merging the support for Multi-Level Cells NAND, from Boris Brezillon.
  • Improvements in the MTD subsystem, by Boris Brezillon:
    • Addition of mtd_pairing_scheme, a mechanism which allows to express the pairing of NAND pages in Multi-Level Cells NANDs.
    • Improvements in the selection of NAND timings.

In addition, a number of Bootlin engineers are also maintainers in the Linux kernel, so they review and merge patches from other developers, and send pull requests to other maintainers to get those patches integrated. This lead to the following activity:

  • Maxime Ripard, as the Allwinner co-maintainer, merged 78 patches from other developers.
  • Grégory Clement, as the Marvell EBU co-maintainer, merged 43 patches from other developers.
  • Alexandre Belloni, as the RTC maintainer and Atmel co-maintainer, merged 26 patches from other developers.
  • Boris Brezillon, as the MTD NAND maintainer, merged 24 patches from other developers.

The complete list of our contributions to this kernel release: